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Motoring forwards – Find out what drives your vehicle with Trust My Garage

There are many elements to driving a car, but one of the most important is how it’s propelled forwards! Find out all you need to know about which type of “wheel drive” could work best for you with the Trust My Garage blog – read on to discover more.

Front-Wheel Drive

Front-wheel drive is the most common layout for the engine and transmission set-up in the new car market and has been so for the last few decades. It works by the engine only sending power to the front two wheels of the vehicle (hence the name), effectively pulling the car along from the front.

Front-wheel drive is so popular in the car market because it is less complex and more affordable to engineer, compared to rear or four-wheel drive, and it also is better for fuel economy!

However, front-wheel drive does have certain limitations which make it less than ideal for high performance cars. Although many hot hatches do use it, front-wheel drive can’t offer the same kind of rapid acceleration you see from rear or four-wheel drive cars.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684337

Rear-Wheel Drive

While most front-wheel drive cars also sport their engines in the front of the vehicle, with rear-wheel drive vehicles the engine can be located in different places (such as in the middle or rear of the vehicle). Rear-wheel drive works in the opposite manner to front-wheel drive, with the engine sending power to the rear two wheels of the vehicle and using it to push the vehicle forwards from the back.

Rear-wheel drive offers better acceleration than front-wheel drive. Unlike front-wheel drive, it is possible to achieve optimal 50/50 front/rear weight distribution with a rear-wheel drive car, which offers better balance and handling in a vehicle.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684227

However, rear-wheel drive often compromises cabin practicality because the powertrain requires a driveshaft. This creates a bump in the passenger cabin, losing space for anyone sat in the vehicle. Rear-wheel drive is also less efficient than front-wheel drive and can be difficult for drivers to handle if there’s no traction control or road conditions are slippery due to the weather.

Both front- and rear-wheel drive can also be referred to as “Two-wheel drive”, as they only use two of the vehicle’s wheels to propel it forwards.

All-Wheel Drive

All-wheel drive offers a setup in which the engine’s power gets sent to a vehicle’s four wheels for maximum traction. All-wheel drive is all about varying the amount of power sent to each wheel, either mechanically or electronically.

All-wheel drive can either be offered as a part- or full-time system, depending on the model of vehicle and driver preferences. Some models now feature a system that allows the driver to disconnect the rear wheels when driving at speed, reducing drag and improving fuel economy. More expensive systems may also have a feature that engages and disengages all-wheel drive automatically based on the road conditions, detected by sensors around the vehicle and calculated by an onboard computer.

4-Wheel Drive

Sometimes referred to as 4×4, four-wheel drive powertrains are largely associated with SUV models, but can also be found on numerous family and executive cars, especially among vehicles with higher specs.

This system’s main distinction is that it’s typically used on vehicles designed and built to handle the unpaved wilderness.

Unlike all-wheel drive, it sends power to all four wheels equally and without variation, meaning each wheel will spin at the same constant rate as all the others. The equal split of power is great for manoeuvring through tough, low-traction situations, but it isn’t very friendly on the pavement.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684357

Driving a four-wheel drive car on solid ground can make simple actions like turning around in a tight street very difficult, because the wheels are no longer in sync. Most modern four-wheel drive vehicles are equipped with a part-time system, meaning they operate in two-wheel drive mode in normal driving conditions. This way, the driver can engage the four-wheel drive system manually from the cabin only where necessary.

Keeping your vehicle in wheely good condition

Regardless of how your motor is propelled forwards, it’s important to keep it in a safe and legal driving condition. For a professional garage experience, you can find a local CTSI approved Trust My Garage member by visiting the Trust My Garage website’s ‘Find a Garage’ map!

Apart from finding a garage nearby, you can also read reviews from other motorists about the members in your area to help you decide which garage is right for you. Try it out here:

Every garage in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association, which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice, so they can help you motor on happily and safely.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for you and your vehicle – and you can find out more by visiting us at TrustMyGarage.co.uk or checking out our Facebook and Twitter pages!

Drive safe during summer downpours

Flood

Britain has experienced flooding during recent weeks

Driving in wet weather

Over the past few weeks, Britain has experienced heavy out-of-season showers. In some cities, these downfalls have proven too much for drainage systems, as flooding has been seen throughout the country. Although 20 June marked the official first day of summer, weather reports suggest that it may not be time to pack away the umbrellas and wellies just yet. When it comes to driving, too, extra precautions ought to be taken.

As most will remember from the theory driving test, rain can severely impair driving conditions. Aside from the splutters and splats of raindrops obscuring windscreens, stopping distances and visibility are also affected. Lack of care, when driving in the rain, can lead to lack of control, collision, and, in extreme cases, fatalities – so keeping safe during downfalls is essential. Acting as further solution, it has been suggested that drivers ought to avoid driving during extreme weather conditions, if possible.

Richard Gladman, Head of Driving Standards, said: “Only travel in extreme adverse weather conditions if it is really necessary.”

For most, avoiding the weather can be impractical, but there are easy ways to ensure greater safety when driving during the current weather conditions.

Here’s a list of things to consider during your summer downpour driving:

Car checks

The last thing you want, when caught up in a spell of heavy rains, is to have your vision restricted due to damaged or dirty windscreen wipers. With the current unforgiving conditions, it is important to make sure that your senses, as well as your motor, are fully functional. During extreme downfall, it can become near impossible to see more than the stampede of raindrops on your windscreen, which makes it increasingly difficult to spot a potential hazard. What’s more, excess water decreases the amount of grip your tyres have on the road, which could lead to slipping and sliding, should your breaks be pressed too abruptly. Avoid potential casualties by ensuring your lights, windscreen wipers and tyre pressures are all present and correct, and be sure to stay attentive. Contact your local Trust My Garage to carry out all your essential car checks.

Route plan

Planning is key when it comes to driving in extreme weather conditions. Where it is best to avoid travelling altogether, if this is unavoidable, forward-thinking is important. Gladman said: “Before setting off, check for any weather alerts, traffic updates or planned road closures that may affect your journey.” It is beneficial to clue yourself up on any roads in your area that are prone to flooding; this will allow you to avoid potentially dangerous routes. What’s more, it is best to allow more time to reach your destination, as the current weather can lead to longer routes, more diversions and lengthier traffic queues. These circumstances could lead to stress behind the wheel which can poorly affect your driving. Stay safe by planning your journey in advance, and leaving out earlier than usual.

 Road surfaces

It’s no secret that some road surfaces around the country are a little worse for wear; what’s more, heavy rains often lead to them becoming even more damaged. As well as leading to a slightly bumpier journey, damaged road surfaces can also be detrimental to your tyres, causing excessive wear and tear. In clear weathers, it is far easier to avoid potholes or chips in the road; however, during the rain, puddles make them increasingly difficult to spot. A tip for spotting potentially impaired surfaces is to look out for any loose chunks of tarmac, as these are signs of damaged road surfaces.

Visibility

With heavy rains deterring vision, it is important for motorists to stay visible. Switching on your dipped headlights will allow other drivers to see you easily – without overwhelming them with the glare of your full beams. When driving an unfamiliar car, it is important to make sure you are aware of how buttons and switches work before setting off on your journey. In extreme weather conditions, familiarise yourself with the light switches and settings before revving off.

Speed

It is a fact that stopping distance increases during wet weather. Due to the excess water on the roads, your tyres grip is far less efficient, so slips and skids can be unavoidable. During extreme weathers, it is essential to consider your speed, as the physics of driving in the rain dictates that the higher the speed, the greater the stopping distance. Stay safe by sticking to the speed limit and keeping a safe space between you and the car ahead.

Reduced speed will also provide a smoother ride when driving through large puddles. When driving through excess waters, or at high speeds on wet roads, your car faces the risk of building up a layer of water between the vehicle’s wheels and the road which cannot be cleared by the tread on the tyres. If this becomes too much for the car to handle, your vehicle could lose traction which prevents the car from responding to your controls, and gaining a mind of its own. This is called aquaplaning, and gives you the feeling that your car is on water-skis. You may also notice the car becoming much quieter, as the noise of tyres on tarmac will disappear.

In this event, although instinct may dictate it, it’s best to avoid slamming on the brakes or jerking as these can lead to skidding. Should this happen, allow the vehicle to follow the path that it wants to and ease your foot off the accelerator until you can feel friction and traction coming back to your wheels. At this point, it is safe for you to gently nudge your steering wheel and use your brakes lightly (if your car has ABS, at this point, you can brake normally). More preventatively, keeping a steady pace will allow for a more streamlined approach to the water, decreasing your chances of aquaplaning, or spraying other road users.

Aquaplaning is much more likely if your tyres are worn, so be sure to check your tread depth regularly.

Emergencies

In extreme circumstances, torrential rain can interfere with the electrics of your vehicle, leading to a breakdown. Plan ahead for any emergencies by keeping your mobile phone charged, so you can call for recovery. It is also recommended that you are familiar with your local garage for any repairs that may be needed. Be sure to download the Trust My Garage app or head to the website to locate your nearest trusted garage. While you wait for your recovery service, ensure your bonnet is closed to avoid further complications.

 

Most importantly, during the extreme weather conditions, it’s important to stay warm and dry – ensure your car is kitted out with emergency supplies such as blankets, first-aid kits and extra food and drink.

 

For more information on how to keep you and your car safe during the summer flooding, seek advice from your local Trust My Garage member.

Motorway driving is more than middle lane morons

suitcaseMore of us are choosing a ‘staycation’ this summer according to a recent study by Travelodge, which means our motorways are destined to be busier than ever.motorway

With the new on-the-spot fines for middle-lane hogging coming into play this July there is lots to think about when cruising down the motorways at this time of year.

Two thirds of Britons are taking a summer holiday in the UK this year, which is up from 41% in 2012. When travelling abroad vehicle maintenance is the responsibility of airlines, railway executives and cruise ships providers but when you drive to a staycation, maintenance of your car is your own responsibility.  With all the excitement about getting away this year, are we all thinking about preparing our cars for long   motorway journeys?

It is vital that you check your car is safe for motorway journeys by taking it to a Trust My Garage member for a service. Over one hundred people died on UK motorways in 2011 and 740 were seriously injured. A number of these accidents were results of mechanical faults and vehicle defects, causing such things as; tyre blow-outs, brake failure, and steering mechanism failure.

“So what can I check in order to prevent inconvenient breakdowns and dangerous accidents?”

Steering

The most common type of steering problem is loss of power steering assistance due to damaged hydraulic pipes or a loose drive belt; normally indicated by heaviness in your steering. Smaller modern cars have electric power steering and any problem here may be accompanied by a warning light on the dashboard.

Unsafe Tyres

Last summer it was revealed that the number of people convicted for driving with dangerous or defective tyres was a massive 9,369. If your tyres are inflated too much or too little then you are putting yourself and your passengers at risk of a tyre blow-out, which effectively causes the tyre to explode, making you unbalanced and causing you to swerve out of your lane. This is more likely on a motorway where the tyre temperature is higher because of the sustained high speeds and you will need quick reactions in order to stop safely. It is important that you check your tyre pressures according to your handbook recommendations before you set off for a motorway journey.

Worn Brakes

Unsafe brakes can be caused by worn brake pads, leaking brake fluid, or mechanical failure. You should regularly check these, and especially when you are heading for the motorway as responsive brakes are essential when stopping suddenly at such high speeds. If you are starting to feel increased or decreased resistance when stopping then it is time to consult a trusted garage.

Low Fluids

All fluids under the bonnet should be checked regularly, but even more so if you are about to take a long journey on a motorway. These include brake fluid, oil, engine coolant – if any of these are running  low  you run the risk of breaking down on the motorway, which is  dangerous with other vehicles moving past at 70mph – so make sure you are all topped up before you set off on the motorway and don’t forget to check the temperature gauge as your journey progresses.

If you are unsure about any aspect of your car, your warning light is flashing or your engine is making a grumbling noise, that’s the time to take it to a Trust My Garage member for a professional service. You can find your nearest trusted garage by entering your postcode in our postcode finder HERE

Over 50s can trust independent garages for tricky maintenance

These days peering under the bonnet can be a daunting task – especially for those used to seeing older engines.????????????????????????????????????????????????????

The number of over 50s carrying out basic car maintenance, such as changing the battery, has almost halved over the last five years (17% compared to 10%); instead they are using garages to carry out these basic tasks according to a report from Saga Car Insurance.

Technology is the heart of the modern car which means we are now able to enjoy a smoother ride with added luxury. However, a more advanced level of expertise is needed when something needs altering or repairing. As cars have become more complex, over 50s have become less confident about car maintenance.

Old vs New

A history lesson in brief… Back in the 1970s car manufacturers started using electronic equipment to control vehicle functions and systematically regulate vehicle emissions. This subsequently increased the complexity of the vehicle functions, which improved performance, safety, reliability and fuel efficiency. These increasingly complex systems needed to be controlled and gradually the number of “computers” (or ECUs) in the vehicle grew until we have the modern motor car with its own network of interconnected systems. Although the car can even store and report faults, access to this information is unlikely to be available to the home mechanic.

These ‘on board diagnostics’, are coded, which means you require the technical expertise of a trained mechanic  – who has access to technical data as well as sophisticated and expensive equipment to generate an accurate diagnosis of the car’s problem.

What else do the stats say?

Saga report… TMG says…
One in six (16%)   men take their car to a garage after failing to make basic repairs   themselves. Rather than make a problem worse by taking a DIY   approach, use a trusted independent garage that will get it right first time.   It’s what they are there for! 
DIY car repairs:

  •   15% of over 50s will attempt their own repairs if their car is over 10   years old
  •   8% of over 50s will attempt their own repairs if their car is under   one year old
Whatever the age of your car, using a professional   is always the safest bet, even if you think you can do it yourself.   Sometimes, the upfront cost savings in DIY repairs can end up costing you   much more in larger repair work down the road, or in the loss of insurance   coverage because you didn’t go to a professional. 
Only 2% of women   are likely to attempt making repairs to their car compared with 15% of men. Women are making a wise move here. TMG members pride   themselves on being ‘female’ friendly, as they try to stub out the old stigma   attached to the industry.  They explain   all their costs in a transparent manner and offer a professional and personal   service to everyone.

 

A different report from Saga last month found that over a third of drivers over 50 are also trying to reduce their motoring spend. When it comes to taking your car for a service or repair, using an independent garage is the most cost efficient way to do it.

See our very own Infographic (infographic link) highlighting research from the Independent Garage Association (IGA). It shows that by visiting an independent garage you could be spending on average, £40 an hour less than if you visited a main dealer.

If you can relate to this post, then make sure you find your most local TMG member to make sure a professional and friendly mechanic is looking at your car and making it roadworthy… first time round!

5 reasons why you need to straighten your car out

Ideally you should be checking your wheel alignment as often as you get your car serviced and every time you have a tyre change!

OK- how many of you just winced because you never check your wheel alignment, or have never even thought about getting it checked?wheel alignment

If it has never seemed important, here are the top 5 reasons why you should be checking regularly that the wheels of your car are perpendicular to the road and parallel to one another.

1. SAFETY for you and your passengers

Badly aligned wheels will result in your car being pulled to one side of the road ultimately putting everyone in the car at unnecessary risk. Think of it like driving in wet or icy conditions. By not regularly getting your wheel alignment checked you are unintentionally making driving an unsafe practice.

2. Save fuel and costs

You wouldn’t initially think it, but when your wheels are not properly aligned it adds extra pressure on your tyres and they push against each other. This then creates higher resistance between your tyres and the road, making it harder for your car to move forward, and consequently using up more fuel. In addition to this the extra fuel usage means you are burning more fossil fuels which significantly harm the environment.

3. Reduce your carbon footprint

These days, everybody is trying to reduce their own carbon footprint and by making sure your wheels are correctly aligned, you can manage your emissions. The extra fuel usage needed to move your car forward when poor alignment is causing your wheels to fall under extra pressure, means that more fossil fuels are being burned and you are inadvertently contributing to global emissions. By having your wheel alignment regularly checked, you can help to improve your own carbon footprint.

4. Extend the lifespan of your tyres

New tyres can be a real drain on your bank account, and the price of wheel alignment at a garage is likely to be a fraction of the cost of brand new tyres. As mentioned, badly aligned wheels add more pressure onto your tyres – and this burns the rubber much faster. If you read our previous blog HERE on tyre depth, you will see that bald tyres are extremely dangerous and costly – so you need to keep an eye on these for both your safety and to save money.

5. Avoid knock on effects

Not addressing your wheel alignment can take its toll on other parts of your vehicle. Wheel alignment is carefully defined by the vehicle manufacturers to ensure that the car will always handle in a safe and secure manner. Misaligned wheels , which can often be caused by the poor state of our roads – not helped by the proliferation of traffic calming measures – can literally have a “knock-on” effect on other components such as brakes, steering and suspension.”

What should you do next?
Trust My Garage advises that you get your wheel alignment checked every 6,000 miles or every six months. Get your nearest Trust My Garage member to cast their expert eye over your tyres for peace of mind. You can find your nearest member HERE.