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Don’t put off your garage visit – here’s how to get in to gear and book your first MOT

A new survey has revealed that a fifth of drivers aged 17 to 25 have admitted to putting off taking their car in for repairs or servicing – so why are young motorists avoiding a visit to the garage?

 

The survey showed that over two-fifths (43 per cent) said their biggest worry was the cost of repairs, but 19 per cent also said they were worried about not understanding what the mechanic was saying and 17 per cent said they felt intimidated. (source)

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Trust My Garage is here to help you make sure you’re getting the best out of your visit to a garage – so read on to learn how you can make sure you’re satisfied with every step of your experience!

 

Getting your MOT booked in

When it’s time for your first MOT it can be an intimidating experience, especially if you don’t know where to start with finding a reputable garage. With Trust My Garage all our members adhere to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved Code of Conduct, meaning you know that you’re visiting an independent garage that will uphold the highest levels of service for you and your vehicle.

 

To find your nearest TMG member, you can use our ‘Find a Garage’ map. This handy tool allows you to input your postcode and find your nearest Trust My Garage member, and you can even read honest reviews from other customers of a garage to see what they’re like! If you decide you want to contact a garage, all their details are displayed so you can take whatever information you need.

 

Taking your vehicle for an MOT

Visiting a garage for the first time can seem like a scary prospect – but the staff are there to help you! A regular MOT will give your car an MOT certificate, with all the necessary information about your car listed for you to read, as below: 

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There’s a maximum amount MOT test stations can charge. This depends on the type of vehicle. The maximum fee for a car is £54.85 and £29.65 for a standard motorcycle. Any other work that your vehicle needs on top of the standard MOT will cost extra – but if it’s minor or advisory you can have it repaired shortly after your MOT (if necessary) instead of at the same time.
Your certificate also lists any defects under the new categories, so they’re clear and easy to understand. These are how the new categories can affect you: 

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If you drive your vehicle without a valid MOT, you can be fined up to £1,000 – and that’s a cost that nobody wants!

 

Understanding issues and repairs to your vehicle

If your vehicle has had to undertake any kind of repair work, the garage you use should be able to explain what has happened to the vehicle and how it can be/has been repaired. If you aren’t sure about any information, ask! Technicians understand that most motorists aren’t as clued-up to the inner workings of a vehicle as they may be and should be able to describe – or even show you – where an issue has arisen or has been fixed. It might seem silly to ask but if it helps you know what’s going on with your car, a professional should be happy to provide as much detail as they can.

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Keeping your vehicle healthy

When it comes to motor maintenance, there is some simple advice: Don’t ignore warning lights and other indications that something isn’t right. Waiting until your MOT is due to fix these can result in a costly surprise! The best way to ensure the health of your car and its roadworthiness is to address mechanical problems as they arise. If you need to familiarise yourself with dashboard symbols, you can always take a look at our “Getting to know your vehicle’s dashboard” blog post, or by reading your vehicle’s Owner Manual.

 

For more general issues, you can also read our “How can regular vehicle maintenance save you money?” blog post for some ideas on how to ensure your vehicle is kept running in tip-top condition – and how to make sure you don’t spend a fortune! 

 

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

 

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who must comply with a strict code of practice. Every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for your money.

 

Visit www.TRUSTMYGARAGE.co.uk and type in your postcode to find your nearest trusted independent garage.

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It’s time to go back to school – and back to basics with driver safety!

Across the UK this week, thousands of children are heading back to school – but when it comes to the school run, how can you ensure you’re being a safe motorist? Trust My Garage has put together some top tips for keeping yourself and others secure in the car and around other road users! Read on for more.

 

  1. Be extra observant

As a driver, if you’re near a school you’ll need to keep a watchful eye for children walking and cycling, as they might be distracted and excited.

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  1. Choose a safe place to drop your child off

It can be tough to park near to the school, but you can aim for somewhere you won’t cause congestion and danger to those walking or cycling to school. If there are zig-zag markings on the ground outside the school, motorists are banned from parking, waiting or stopping there during school hours.

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  1. Reduce your speed

This can be a hugely important to safety where you see lots of children – especially near to schools. If you are driving at 30mph and a child runs out your stopping distance will be at least 23 metres, so keep your speeds low and your eyes peeled for hazards! Some school areas also operate a variable 20mph limit during drop-off and collection times, which is highlighted with a flashing amber light and sign indicating the lower speed limit is being enforced.

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  1. Plan for additional traffic on the roads

The school year comes with a substantial increase in morning and evening traffic, so drivers should allow an extra 10 or 15 minutes for their morning commute – it’s better to be early than to rush and speed when travelling to and from work.

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  1. Look out for the lollipop!

When you see a Lollipop helper start to cross the road (usually with a brightly coloured vest and sign) come to a complete stop to allow children to cross safely. Proceed with caution once the helper has returned to the path and has lowered their sign.

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  1. Dont use your mobile phone whilst driving

Making or receiving a call, even using a ‘hands free’ phone, can distract your attention from driving and could lead to an accident – and using a device while driving is illegal and will result in a 6-point penalty and £200 fine. If you need to make a call, pull over in a safe space, turn off your engine and remove the key from the ignition. In 2017, 14% of drivers still said it was acceptable to take a call while driving (source) but it can lead to serious injury to drivers and pedestrians.

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  1. Be aware of buses

Buses near schools are frequent and often filled with children of all ages going to and from school. If you’re driving anywhere near a bus be on the lookout for children stepping out unexpectedly, as well as the vehicle itself moving into and out of the road at bus stops.

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If you’re looking to get your vehicle checked out ready for your school run and commute you can visit your nearest Trust My Garage member! All TMG garages operate to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved Code of Conduct, meaning you and your motor are set to get the best possible service.

 

For more information and to find your nearest garage, visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk or check out the TMG Facebook and Twitter pages.

 

Got any other ideas on staying safe in the car? Be sure to leave your suggestions in the comments!

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Common sense has prevailed: The 3-1-1 MOT is to remain unchanged!

In January last year, the UK government announced it was creating a consultation which could possibly extend the time allowed before the first MOT of a vehicle’s life from three years to four then annually thereafter – known as the 4-1-1 system.

 

At the time, Trust My Garage wrote extensively on why the 4-1-1 system was dangerous in a blog post, viewable here.

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We are now happy to announce that as of January 18th 2018, the outcome of the consultation – based upon public and automotive industry opinion – was that the government has cancelled any plans to extend the time before a vehicle’s first MOT.

Upon the announcement of the consultation last year, Trust My Garage stated:

“If a vehicle has a defect by its third year of use, then extending the MOT for a further year will also have the effect of increasing the number of defects the vehicle carries, because defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then snowball and cause defects with the related components in the vehicle. Not only is this dangerous for motorists, but it could also be costly as minor repairs that could be fixed in the third year could become major defects by the fourth.”

 

According to the consultation’s respondents, much of the public agreed. Most respondents were against the proposals on safety grounds, arguing that the savings to motorists were outweighed by the risk to road users and the test often highlights upcoming issues affecting the vehicle. A public survey for the Department for Transport by Populus also showed fewer than half of people were in favour of the change.

 

Jesse Norman, Roads Minister, said: “Although modern cars are better built and safer than when the MOT test was last changed 50 years ago, there has been a clear public concern that any further changes don’t put people’s lives at risk. We are looking at further research to ensure the MOT test evolves with the demands of modern motoring.”

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Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test in 2015 and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined. (DVSA, 2015) Along with this, more than 770,000 vehicles were discovered to have a dangerous defect in 2013/14, equating to nearly 2,200 every day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment. (DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008)

 

To read the full results of the consultation click here.

To find out more about why changes to an MOT’s frequency would be a danger to both vehicles and road users, take a look at the ProMOTe website here.

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If your vehicle is due for an MOT or you feel it needs a bit of maintenance, why not visit the Trust My Garage website and find a trusted independent garage in your area? Click here to use our handy Find a Garage map to find your nearest member. If you aren’t when your vehicle’s MOT is due, The DVSA have created a new MOT Reminder Service. To arrange your e-mail reminder, click here.

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The Trust My Garage £1,000 Guarantee – How does it help?

If you take your vehicle for an MOT, service or repair at your local garage, how can you be sure of the quality of its work? At Trust My Garage, we truly believe that our members are the best independent garages in the UK, each one unique but all skilled professionals who are dedicated to providing top quality work with a friendly, personal service.

Don’t just let us tell you how good our members are – you can see the evidence from other consumers too. Based on results from TMG’s online feedback system over the course of 2015, the overall satisfaction rate for TMG members over the last year was 88%, with 98% of consumers satisfied that the member only carried out necessary or quoted work, and 97% of customers were likely to use the member again. You can’t argue with happy customers!

To show how confident we are that you’ll be happy with your next visit to your local TMG member, we’ve launched the Trust My Garage £1,000 Guarantee: a first of its kind financial reassurance scheme backed by the Independent Garage Association (IGA). This means that as well as approval from Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) for the quality of our members, you have the added benefit of financial backing from the IGA.

 

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Need to get your motor fixed? Take it to one of our thousands of Trust My Garage members!

 

It’s very unlikely that you’re ever going to need the TMG £1,000 Guarantee, but it’s there to show that we stand behind our members to underwrite any financial award made following a dispute with one of our members.

But what terms and conditions make up The TMG £1,000 Guarantee, we hear you ask? Well, let’s break it down.

 

How It Works

If you have a problem with one of our members, please contact them and give them a chance to resolve the matter. If you can’t come to a solution, you must follow the complaints procedure as outlined in the Trust My Garage Code of Practice Appendix 2 (full document here).

You will need to file an official complaint with the National Conciliation Service (NCS), our independent Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) provider, at www.nationalconciliationservice.co.uk.

If you are judged to be in the right after completing the ADR process, the IGA will underwrite the payment of any financial award up to £1,000 in the event that the garage is unable to make the payment.

 

The Application Process

Under normal circumstances where the ADR process finds in your favour, any financial award will be paid to you by the garage promptly. It is only if this payment is not made after 14 days have elapsed that a claim may be made under the TMG £1,000 Guarantee.

You MUST follow the process as set out in the Trust My Garage Code of Practice for your claim to be eligible under the guarantee. To make a claim, call the TMG helpline on 0845 305 4230 and have your NCS claim reference to hand.

If you want to know more details, you can take a look at our TMG £1,000 Guarantee full terms and conditions.

 

We’re certain that our independent garages will make a great job of any work on your vehicle – so if you need a service, MOT, repair, or just a once-over, head to the Trust My Garage website to find your local TMG member, or for more information about The Trust My Garage £1,000 Guarantee you can click here.

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Why is the MOT so important for vehicles?

Every year from the age of three your car should, by law, go in for an MOT test. But what exactly does the MOT do and why are they so important?

 

What even is an MOT?

During an MOT, the most important parts of your vehicle are “checked to make sure they meet the legal standards” (Gov). By having an MOT, you’re making sure that your car is safe to drive on UK roads. It’s called an MOT because it was originally named after the original Ministry of Transport (MoT). (source)

 

But I’ve had my car serviced, isn’t that the same?

Simply put, no. The MOT does not cover the condition of the engine, clutch or gearbox, which are the parts of your car that will be looked at during a service. The MOT looks at mechanical parts of your car and emissions as well. 

 

Ok, so what parts of my car does the MOT look at?

The MOT provides you with an evaluation on the condition of most of your car, such as bodywork, fuel, seats, brakes and tyres. For a more in-depth breakdown of all the parts of your car looked at during the MOT, you can have a look at the full government list here, or take a look at the photo below.

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Car parts looked at during the MOT (source)

So why is the MOT so important for my car?

Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test last year and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined. (DVSA, 2015) Even with a regular test every year, that’s still just under 11 million vehicles that aren’t fit to drive on UK roads.

With the Government opening their new consultation about extending the time before a car’s first MOT, it’s important to think about how many more dangerous vehicles – which could be over 3 and a half million! – that could be around in just one extra year’s time. 

 

 

Wait, the government want to do what?

Yes, you read that right. The government have opened a public consultation asking for opinions on whether a car should be able to wait 4 years for its first MOT, instead of 3. It’s being called the 4-1-1 system, and while it might seem like a good idea, the facts say otherwise. There is a belief that because modern cars are more reliable, they do not need to be tested so strictly. In practice this is incorrect. Not only is the current MOT failure rate higher than it was in 2008 (when vehicles were less reliable), components designed to wear out – like tyres and brakes – are far more likely to have become dangerous by the time the vehicle is four years old. 

 

But an extra year with no MOT would save me money, right?

Well, that isn’t exactly the case. Extending the time allowed before the first MOT of a car or motorcycle’s life from three years to four would likely prove more expensive for motorists, as it would raise the likelihood that minor problems become more serious defects – which then triggers in turn further defects which require more significant and more costly repairs later. It may also be the case that defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then result in defects in different but associated components which would otherwise have remained serviceable. The defects are therefore cumulative – which could cost you even more money. 

 

But my car looks fine, so why would it even need an MOT?

While it’s true that your car may look fine at a glance, when was the last time you checked the tread on your tyres? Do you know the proper depth it needs to be at to be road safe? Do you think your brakes are as responsive as when you first got your car? Are the electrics still safe and functioning properly? The MOT is designed to ensure your vehicle is as safe as possible when you drive it, and lets you know if there are any problems before they become a real danger to you and other road users. 

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Surely it can’t be that much of a problem though?

That’s where you’re wrong. In 2013/14 there were more than 770,000 vehicles discovered during MOT tests with a dangerous defect. Nearly 2,200 EVERY day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment (DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008). Now, when you go out on to the roads, do you want over 2,000 chances of being in an accident due to a dangerous car?

 

You’re right, that’s bad! But what can I do to stop it happening?

For a start, you can take your vehicle for its yearly MOT, to make sure it’s in the best possible condition. If you’re looking for a garage that will carry out a thorough, DVSA standard MOT you can find your nearest trusted independent garage on the Trust My Garage website. All the garages are Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved and are ready to do the best work for you and your vehicle. 

You can also head over proMOTe’s website if you’re looking for some more facts, or you can to the Government website and take a look at the MOT consultation yourself. It’s open for response from all members of the public, so if you think it’s a bad idea, like we do, let the government know!

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Proposed MOT changes: Why the 4-1-1 system is dangerous

The Government has announced a proposal to consult on extending the time allowed before the first MOT of a vehicle’s life from three years to four – known as the 4-1-1 system (Summer Budget, 2015).

While many motorists may think this is a good idea, there is ever-growing evidence that the increase of faulty and potentially dangerous cars on UK roads would result in extra injuries and possibly even deaths. 

The Department for transport (DfT) released a report that stated that the addition of an extra year before a car’s first MOT could mean injuries rise by 2,000 a year, with an estimated 71 of those injuries being fatal.

Evidently any move to extend the time allowed before the first MOT of a car or motorcycle’s life from three years to four years would seriously endanger road safety for all road users.

Not only would the changes be dangerous, but they mean that there would also be an increase in repair costs for drivers and an inevitable increase in harmful emissions due to the additional time that vehicles had been active on the roads without the essential checks carried out during an MOT. 

 There have been previous attempts in government to introduce an extended first MOT period – in 2008 and 2011 – both of which considered the 4-1-1 as a structure for MOT frequency, and both at both of these times the government decided that no changes should take place. There have been no changes in the MOT design or car safety that would then mean that the 4-1-1 structure is now viable. 

Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test in 2015 and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined.(DVSA, 2015)  Along with this, more than 770,000 vehicles were discovered to have a dangerous defect in 2013/14, equating to nearly 2,200 every day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment.(DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008)

 Currently many vehicles are found to be unroadworthy at three years old; therefore it stands to reason that extending the MOT to four years will mean there are even more vehicles on the roads in a potentially dangerous condition. There is a belief that because modern cars are more reliable, they do not need to be tested so strictly. In practice this is incorrect. Not only is the current MOT failure rate higher than it was in 2008 (when vehicles were less reliable), components designed to wear out – like tyres and brakes – are likely to have become dangerous by the time the vehicle is four years old.

If a vehicle has a defect by its third year of use, then extending the MOT for a further year will also have the effect of increasing the number of defects the vehicle carries, because defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then snowball and cause defects with the related components in the vehicle. Not only is this dangerous for motorists, but it could also be costly as minor repairs that could be fixed in the third year could become major defects by the fourth. 

Not only is the proposed system dangerous to vehicle safety and public safety, it is also dangerous for the environment. Air quality and reducing emissions is a high Government priority, but extending the time allowed before a vehicle’s first MOT allows polluting vehicles (which would have been detected when they were three years old) to go undetected for a further year. This makes them far more likely to increase their polluting emissions as the engine condition further deteriorates. 

The 4-1-1 system paves the way for vehicles to be a source of danger on the roads. You can have your say about it by visiting the government consultation, designed to give people a platform for their opinions before any changes are debated by the government . It is open until Sunday 16th April, 11:45pm. To get have your say click here.

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To find out more about why the proposed changes to MOT frequency are a danger to both vehicles and road users, take a look at the ProMOTe website here.

If you think that your vehicle is due for an MOT or you feel it needs a bit of maintenance, why not visit the Trust My Garage website and find a trusted independent garage in your area? Click here to find your nearest garage