Blog Archives

Little-known ways to get penalty points on your driving licence

At Trust My Garage, we’re committed to keeping motorists across the nation safe – and that means not breaking driving laws! We’ve put together a list of little-known ways that you could get penalty points on your driving licence, and how to avoid them. Take a look at our list below.

 

  1. Distracted driving. Eating, drinking, applying make-up, or changing CDs while driving can rack up between three to nine penalty points – as well as the potential for a £100 fine! These acts are not illegal, but they can severely distract a motorist – and distracted driving is against the law.

How to avoid it: Stay focused on the roads, and if you need to take your hands off the wheel, find a place to pull over safely and adjust yourself and your vehicle accordingly before setting off again.

Think twice before eating, drinking while driving

 

  1. Parking poorly. Parking can strike fear into the hearts of many drivers – nobody wants to get it wrong in front of a queue of impatient drivers! However; if you have parked in a way that obstructs the road, pavement or any other inappropriate location, you could be charged with leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position.

How to avoid it: Look around before parking and consider whether the area you wish to park in is safe – if it isn’t, move on! It will be safer and cheaper than a fine.

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  1. Not keeping your licence up-to-date. Every 10 years you must renew the photograph on your photo card driving licence – you will usually receive a reminder from the DVLA. If you don’t update your information when instructed, your licence will be revoked.

How to avoid it: Pay attention to when your driving licence is due to be renewed and be sure to keep any address information up-to-date with the DVLA.

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  1. S-no-w joke in Winter. Failing too clear snow from your vehicle’s roof can land you with a £60 fine and three penalty points. Snow and ice can obscure a driver’s view – and even fall off and obstruct the view of other drivers.

How to avoid it: Before setting off, be sure your vehicle is clear of snow and ice, and that it cannot obstruct any other drivers.

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  1. Splashing a pedestrian. Section 3 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 specifies it is an offence to ‘drive without reasonable consideration for other persons using the road’. This includes driving through a puddle on the road that could cause a pedestrian to be splashed. With 63 such incidents reported from 2009-2014, soaking a passer-by is not the way to go to keep a clean licence!

How to avoid it: Try to avoid any puddles in the road, but if impossible slow down to avoid any heavy splash onto the pavement – it’ll be better for your car too!

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  1. Paws on the loose. Motorists must restrain their pets appropriately when driving. Having an unsecured animal in the car could be hazardous to your safety and your wallet! If police decide you’ve been driving without proper control due to a pet you can be hit with a fine from £200 – £2,500, and receive up to nine penalty points.

How to avoid it: Ensure any pets that you travel with have appropriate restraints and cannot distract you while driving – it may be better to keep animals in the rear of your vehicle to help avoid issues.

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  1. Keep your speed low. Unless signposted, most streetlamp-lit roads operate a 30mph policy. Breaking this speed limit can lead to a £100 fine and three penalty points, minimum.

How to avoid it: Be speed aware! Drive carefully and stay under the speed limit. If you’re not sure what it is and the road is streetlamp lit, assume it is 30mph to be safe.

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  1. Keep your eyes peeled. Is your eyesight up to scratch? As a driver, it’s vital you keep up to date with sight checks. If poor eyesight leads to careless driving you could face a fine of up to £1,000 and three penalty points on your licence.

How to avoid it: Schedule regular appointments with an optician, and if you feel any eyestrain beginning to occur – whether driving or not – book an appointment sooner to catch any potential issues early on.

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About Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

 

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

 

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand. If there’s a problem that can’t be sorted out between you and your garage, the IGA takes over and helps to achieve a happy outcome.

 

For more information about Trust My Garage or to locate your nearest TMG member visit www.trustmygarage.co.uk.

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Motoring scams – how can you stay safe?

When it comes to motoring, we at Trust My Garage want to make sure drivers stay as safe as possible on the roads. That’s why we’ve created our ever-growing network of trusted independent garages, to keep your vehicle running in optimum condition and keep you as happy as possible.

 

However, there are others who wish to ruin your motoring experience by submitting drivers to a variety of scams, which can damage both your vehicle and your bank account – and we don’t think that’s fair to you. In order to help you stay aware of potential dangers, we’ve put together information about some recent scams that have affected unfortunate motorists.

 

The speeding fine email

As recently as October 2017, scam emails have been circulated to motorists advising them of ‘Notice of Intended Prosecution’ or ‘NIP’ for a speeding offence. These emails have been supposedly sent from the Government or police and can even claim to have ‘photographic evidence’ of the offence, however they are completely false.

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The only way legitimate notices of intended prosecution are sent is via Royal Mail to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) registered address, so anyone who receives this email is advised to report it to Action Fraud, the national Fraud & Cyber Crime Reporting Centre, and delete it without clicking any links or attachments.

 

The whiplash accident

According to ABI figures, the national cost of whiplash claims makes up 20 per cent of the average insurance premium, while insurer Aviva claims that a staggering 94 per cent of all its compensation claims for motor accidents relate to minor whiplash. (source)

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Minor whiplash is very hard to prove or disprove, but if you suspect someone is fraudulently claiming whiplash against you after a small collision, seek the advice of a solicitor to see if you can fight it.

There have been recent attempts to clamp down on false whiplash claims, however the difficulty in verifying the claims have led to new legislation, known as the ‘2015 dishonestly laws’, being put into place in order to correctly punish fraudulent claimants.

 

The ‘cash for crash’ scheme

‘Cash for crash’ is the nickname given to schemes where a scammer intentionally crashes into another driver in order to make a fraudulent claim on their insurance. Often tied in with whiplash claims, ‘crash for cash’ costs the UK £340m every year, with profits frequently funding other criminal activities such as firearms and drug dealing. The BBC states:

“Crash for cash scammers choose their victims carefully – they keep an eye out for drivers who look like they would be fully insured but be less likely to cause a fuss. Mothers with children on board and the elderly are favoured victims. If you’ve been a victim, the circumstances are likely to be as follows:

The accident

A car in front of you slams on the brakes for no obvious reason, and you have no time to react and collide with the car in front. Another scenario (known as ‘flash for cash’) happens when a driver flashes their lights at a junction to let you out, then crashes into you deliberately.

The blame

The other driver will insist the accident is your fault. The scammer will then hand over their insurance details – sometimes already prepared and written down.

 The claim

A few weeks after the accident your insurers will write to you with details of the other driver’s claim which will be exaggerated with costs like car hire, recovery and whiplash injuries.” (source)

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So how can you avoid this scam? It helps to pay attention to the driver and passengers of other cars around you – people frequently looking backwards or driving erratically can be a giveaway of a ‘cash for crash’ scheme in process. Try and keep a safe braking distance away from other vehicles and be sure to watch for cars turning and manoeuvring around you. Fraudsters may even try and disable their brake lights to try and cause an accident, so make sure to pay attention to your surroundings.

 

The online car-buying con

Not content with damaging your existing car, there has even been a scam designed to trap motorists purchasing cars online, via sites such as eBay. Cons like these use cloned cars – which is like automobile identity theft – to sell illegal vehicles under legal details, leaving buyers out of pocket with an illegal vehicle. The stolen vehicle is given the identity of a similar legitimate car, including licence plates, chassis numbers and accompanying documentation. Prospective buyers can run a background check on the car and the details will appear to be correct.

One victim lost £17,000 after paying in cash for a Mercedes later discovered to be cloned and was left with no way to regain their lost money due to no proof of transaction.

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How can you avoid this scam? The best method is to purchase via authorised sellers, like garages and dealerships, but viewing a car in person is always beneficial and ensuring you pay for your purchase via a traceable, secure method means there is evidence of your purchase and the recipient of your money should anything go awry.

 

What should you do if you think you’ve been a scam victim?

The first steps in reporting a scam, especially one where you have lost money, should be to report it to Action Fraud. If you wish to get in contact with your local authorities for a crime number, you can also call or visit your local police station. For further information and for other types of scam advice, Citizens Advice can provide more information, viewable here.

Action Fraud

Telephone: 0300 123 2040

Textphone: 0300 123 2050

Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm

Website: www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

About Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

 

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

 

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand. If there’s a problem that can’t be sorted out between you and your garage, the IGA takes over and helps to achieve a happy outcome.

 

For more information about Trust My Garage or to locate your nearest TMG member visit www.trustmygarage.co.uk.tmg_ctsi_long