Blog Archives

Prepare your vehicle for the New Year with Trust My Garage

With the imminent arrival of 2021 it’s important to get your vehicle ready for the New Year – but what steps can you take to ensure you’re motoring happy over the next 12 months? The Trust My Garage blog is here to help! Read on to find out what you need to know.

MOT

This year has been an unprecedented experience for almost everyone, including motorists. For safety, the DVSA began to issue six-month MOT extensions for vehicles due an MOT between April and the end of July. The extension means that many vehicles due their MOT over the summer will now been condensed into the last few month of 2020, creating much longer waiting times for MOT appointments.

The extension was entirely optional, and you were still able take your vehicle to your local Trust My Garage member garage at its normal MOT time, which is usually in line with its registration, if you want to do so. This may be helpful if your key dates, such as MOT, tax renewal and insurance renewal, are due at the same time, as it will be easier to remember.

The DVSA have predicted a 24 per cent increase in demand for MOT’s in December and a 45 per cent increase in January, so a great way to prepare for the New Year is to ensure your test is booked in plenty of time ready for its due date and avoid your car being unusable due to an expired MOT.

To check when your vehicle’s MOT test is due, you can visit https://.gov.uk/check-mot-history. All you need is your vehicle’s registration number!

Tax

About a month before your road tax expires the DVLA will issue you with a V11 Vehicle Tax Reminder, containing the information you need to either renew your tax online, via telephone or at a Post Office branch. Your V11 will also tell you the date your current road tax period will expire.

You can check the status of your road tax or renew it online via the Gov.uk website. Driving without road tax will result in a DVLA-imposed fine of £80, which can be reduced by half if paid in 28 days. However, it could result in a fine of up to £1,000 or five times the annual road tax fee if the case goes to court. Even if your vehicle is not being driven but is parked on a public road, if you’ve forgotten to pay tax, it could be clamped or even impounded!

Insurance

It’s illegal to drive a vehicle on a road or in a public place without at least 3rd party insurance – and even if the vehicle itself is insured, if you’re not correctly insured to drive it you could get penalised. The police could give you a fixed penalty of £300 and 6 penalty points if you’re caught driving a vehicle you’re not insured to drive.

If the case goes to court you could get :

  • an unlimited fine
  • disqualified from driving

The police also have the power to seize, and in some cases, destroy the vehicle that’s being driven uninsured. You can check your vehicle insurance renewal date with your insurance provider, and you can do a quick check on whether your vehicle is insured here: https://ownvehicle.askmid.com/

Car maintenance

It’s important to make sure your vehicle is running at its best ready for the next year, so take time to ensure your motor isn’t displaying any warning lights on the dashboard, your fluid levels are topped up as needed and your lights are working clearly with no damaged or broken bulbs.

Our “What to do when… your vehicle needs some TLC” post covers the basics you need, in detail, to make sure you’re driving into 2021 with all cylinders firing.

The other posts in our ‘What to do when…’ series can also provide some further tips and insight across many areas of motoring and vehicle maintenance to help you ensure your motor is running at its best! You can check out our posts in the series here.

Tyres

The tread of a tyre refers to the rubber on its circumference that makes contact with the road or ground. The legal limit for minimum tread depth in the UK is 1.6mm across the central three-quarters, however it is recommended to keep your tyres at 3mm or above for optimum grip. Drivers who fail to comply with the regulations face a fine of up to £2,500 and three penalty points for each illegal tyre.

The ‘20p test’ is a quick way to check the tread depth. Place a 20p coin into the main tread grooves at three points across the tyre and then repeat around its circumference. If the outer band of the 20p piece is visible, the tyres may be unsafe or illegal and need to be checked by a professional garage or tyre specialist.

You can check and correct your tyre pressure at most UK petrol stations using a pay-per-use air and water station, or you can purchase your own tyre pressure gauge – the choice is yours.

If you aren’t sure what pressure is correct for your vehicle’s tyres you can refer to your Owner’s Manual. Details should be provided in either/both BAR and PSI, and you can adjust your pressures to the recommended figure. Often a vehicle’s tyre pressure information is also provided on the interior frame of the front passenger or driver’s door, and sometimes inside the fuel flap, so be sure to check there if you need a quick reference point as well.

Find out more in our “What to do when… you need to check your vehicle’s tyres” blog post.

Finding a local garage

If you’re looking for a professional local garage to help you, you can find a local CTSI approved Trust My Garage member by visiting the Trust My Garage website’s ‘Find a Garage’ map! You can even read reviews from other motorists about the members in your area to help you decide which garage is right for you. Try it out here:

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s trusted local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

Every garage in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association, which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for you and your vehicle.

Keep your vehicle germ-free with Trust My Garage

During the coronavirus pandemic, the importance of keeping clean has been highlighted in every aspect of daily life – so when it comes to your vehicle, what are the best ways to keep the germs at bay? Find out with the Trust My Garage blog by reading on!

In a survey of 1,000 drivers, 38 per cent said they only clean their car once every couple of months, 16 per cent said they did it just once a year and 9 per cent said they clean their less than once every 12 months – but why is keeping your motor clean so important?

As a vehicle is often a communal space, whether for work or personal use, motorists must be careful to ensure their car or van is kept free from as many germs as possible – especially if multiple drivers and passengers utilise the vehicle.

Before

Before getting into your vehicle, you can attempt to keep germs on your person at a minimum by washing your hands with soap and warm water or use hand sanitiser if you can’t get to a sink. As people use their hands for almost everything, they are a major point of transfer for germs to get from one point to another.

By washing or sanitising prior to getting into a vehicle, you are removing any potentially unwanted germs from your hands and stopping them coming into contact with door handles, seatbelts and seatbelt fasteners, the steering wheel and any other controls within your vehicle. If you have antiviral wipes, consider keeping them in the car to wipe down surfaces. Always read the instructions as some wipes may not be suitable for the surfaces and materials inside cars.

During

If you’re concerned about sharing your vehicle with other drivers or passengers, try to keep touching any unnecessary objects and parts of the car to a minimum – unless it is negatively affecting your driving, vision or comfort. Where possible, travel alone and only make essential trips to keep chances of germ transference as low as possible. Where you are required to carry others in your car, consider asking them to sit in the rear seats to remain within social distancing guidance as best as possible.

After

Once you have exited your vehicle at your destination, clean and sanitise any surfaces you have touched inside the car with a wipe or other cleaning product to remove any bacteria. Once done, throw the used item/s immediately into a bin and do not re-use.

Just like before you step into a vehicle, wash or sanitise your hands as soon as possible, and where possible refrain from touching any other items or surfaces until you have been able to clean your hands.

If you have arrived home from a journey, remove your shoes, coat and any other items such as a handbag and sanitise them as best as possible before touching other objects or surfaces in your house. Again, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after you’ve finished cleaning.

Vehicle Care

Regular cleaning of the exterior and interior of your vehicle may help you avoid germ-heavy spots – particularly in areas you touch frequently such as door handles, seatbelt buckles, the ignition, steering wheel and controls such as indicators and wiper stalks. Soap and water is a proven method to remove the virus, or you can use rubbing alcohol of at least 60% purity or specific car cleaning products if you prefer.

If you are looking at using cleaning product, do your research to locate one that works best for you. For example, leather interiors can require different cleaning products to cloth upholstery to avoid damage to the leather, so make sure you’re using the appropriate materials to keep your car looking great as well as staying clean.

This video also details some great ways to keep your car germ-free, so you can check out these tips:

Other, manufacturer-specific videos are also available if you’re looking for information tailored to your vehicle make too.

If you’re looking for help or guidance about cleaning and maintaining your vehicle during the lockdown, you could also call your local garage and ask for advice! Garages have been classed by the government as an essential business, so can remain open. Some may be operating on reduced hours, so check the opening times and contact details of your nearest member using the Trust My Garage website’s Find a Garage map – try it out here:

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s trusted local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

Every garage in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association, which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who must comply with a strict code of practice. Every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for you and your vehicle. If you want to find out more about Trust My Garage, visit our website, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

What to do when… You need to visit a Garage for vehicle maintenance

With 47% of UK drivers worried about the cost of unexpected vehicle repairs, you’re not alone if you aren’t sure what to do when you need to visit a garage! With drivers spending an average of £574 each per year on car repairs, it’s important to know the best way to go about getting your vehicle into the workshop, so find out below with Trust My Garage!

Assess the issue

If you have any vehicle knowledge it is worth taking the time to assess your suspected issue, as this can save time for the technician once your vehicle is in the workshop. If you aren’t sure of what or where the issue is, advise the garage of this so they can take the time to fully inspect your vehicle and, where possible, determine the nature of the problem.

Explaining any problems – such as a concerning noise of vibration when driving at speed/on start-up – to the garage, will give them vital information and help them find the root cause of the problem quicker.

Locate a garage that suits you

If you aren’t sure where to begin when looking for a garage, you can make it easy for yourself with Trust My Garage! By using our ‘Find a Garage’ map you can check out the garages in your area who work to a CTSI-approved Code of Conduct. You can even read reviews and request a quote for the work your vehicle needs! Try it out here:

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. All Trust My Garage members also operate to the TMG ‘Code of Practice for Service and Repair.

IGA members are true professionals who must comply with a strict code of practice. Every customer of a Trust My Garage member can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for your money.

See what parts are needed

Should your vehicle need parts to complete the repair, these will be quoted for, along with the labour cost to fit them. If you’re looking to compare more than one garage’s prices you can ask for this information upfront before going ahead with any work to be completed.

With TMG members, you can ask for a fixed quote or estimate, inclusive of parts, labour and VAT prior to approving any work on your vehicle.

Understand your vehicle’s issues and repairs

If your vehicle has had to undertake any kind of repair work, the garage you use should be able to explain what has happened to the vehicle and how it can be/has been repaired. If you aren’t sure about any information, ask! Technicians understand that most motorists aren’t informed of the inner workings of a vehicle and should be able to explain – or even show you – where an issue has arisen or has been fixed.

It might seem silly to ask but if it helps you know what’s going on with your car, a professional should be happy to provide as much detail as they can. You can also ask to inspect any parts removed from your vehicle so you can see if there are any visible issues or differences compared to how the part should look and function.

Maintaining your vehicle

A great way to ensure your vehicle is performing at its best is by keeping up with it prescribed maintenance schedule. Remember; your yearly MOT is a check on the vehicle and not a service.

Trust My Garage members offer a range of services, which you can review on each garage’s profile page on the Trust My Garage website. You can also view photos of the garage, check opening times and see reviews from other customers.

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of customer service and technical know-how. Visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk for more information – and be sure to check out our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages too!

What to do when… your vehicle needs some TLC

With the average UK motorist making 986 trips and covering 6536 miles per year in their car (source), it’s possible that some drivers can leave their motor in need of a little tender loving care when it comes to basic maintenance issues – but how can you make sure you give your vehicle the care it needs? Find out with the Trust My Garage blog!

Tyres

You should check your tyre pressures at least every two weeks – and if your vehicle has a spare, check that too! Under inflated tyres increase fuel consumption and reduce vehicle handling, and they also lead to increased tyre wear, which means your tyres may require replacing sooner than you expect.

The legal limit for minimum tread depth in the UK is 1.6mm across the central three-quarters of the whole tyre, however it is recommended to keep your tyres at 3mm or above for optimum grip. Drivers who fail to comply with the regulations face a fine of up to £2,500 and three penalty points for each illegal tyre. You should also look out for cuts or wear anywhere on the tyre and replace them if you can see tears or bulges.

Engine oil

Use your dipstick (if your vehicle has one) to check oil levels every couple of weeks, when the car is warm and on level ground. Stop the engine and wait a few minutes for the oil to settle, remove the dipstick and wipe it clean.

Push the dipstick all the way in, wait a second, and then withdraw it and check the level. The oil should be between the MIN and MAX marks. If the oil is dark or dirty or underneath the minimum line (or both!) It should be topped up/changed as soon as possible.

Many modern vehicles use an electronic system to check their oil level, so if your vehicle uses this you should familiarise yourself with the system.

Screenwash

It is illegal under the Road Vehicles Regulations 1986 to not have screenwash in your vehicle. Keep it regularly topped up with a screenwash additive – one that prevents it from freezing and clears oily grime from your windscreen for clear vision.

Don’t forget to keep the inside clean too, to avoid your vision being reduced due to glare – especially when the sun gets lower in the sky during daily commutes to and from work.

Water

Every week, while your engine is cold, check your coolant level is between the MIN and MAX marks – if it’s below the minimum line, top it up as required, and check it again after your next journey.

If your coolant level regularly requires topping up you may have a leak in the vehicle’s cooling system, so get it checked out by your local garage!

Windscreen

Keep an eye out for stone damage and, if you spot any chips, get them repaired as soon as possible – as they can grow and crack if left alone. If the damage can’t be repaired, or it’s in a place where it could distract you, your windscreen may need to be replaced.

Many motor insurance policies provide discounted or free chip repairs, and detail how to proceed with your repair.

Bodywork

It’s important to give your car panels an occasional check for any damage, or signs of rust. If you notice any rusty or damaged areas, you can contact a local bodyshop to see how best to proceed with any repairs.

Lights

Take a walk around your vehicle or ask a friend to help check all your lights – including indicators, reversing lights, brake lights and fog lights – once a week. Look out for blown bulbs and cracks or dirt on the lenses.

Your vehicle can receive a Minor Defect notification on its MOT if your indicators do not “flash amber” in compliance with the requirements, so if you have any issues with fading indicator lights you should replace them or have a local garage inspect them – you may only need a new bulb!

If a bulb has broken and you don’t want to replace it yourself you can also take your vehicle to a local garage, who can fix the issue and help you avoid a penalty.

Not sure how best to care for your car?

Our ‘What to do when…’ series can provide some further tips and insight across other areas of motoring and vehicle maintenance to help you ensure your motor is running at its best! You can check out our other posts in the series here.

If you’re looking for a professional local garage to help give your car some TLC you can find a local CTSI approved Trust My Garage member by visiting the Trust My Garage website’s ‘Find a Garage’ map! You can even read reviews from other motorists about the members in your area to help you decide which garage is right for you. Try it out here:

Want to know what we do?

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s trusted local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

Every garage in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association, which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for you and your vehicle.

Don’t forget: If you can think of any more top TLC tips, leave us a comment in the box below!

What to do when… a pothole damages your vehicle

Potholes are no joke when it comes to motoring in the UK, but if your vehicle is damaged due to an issue with the road surface what can you do? Trust My Garage has some handy tips for dealing with the ruin of the roads – check them out here!

If in doubt, get out

If you believe your vehicle has been damaged in any way, find a safe place to pull over and inspect the vehicle. You may want to take photos if there are any obvious areas of damage on the vehicle – and only if it is completely safe, take a photo of the pothole in question.

Vehicle problem? Solved!

If you feel there is a problem with your vehicle as a result of a pothole you can take it to your local Trust My Garage member for diagnosis, and if necessary, repair. To find your nearest member you can use our Find a Garage map, which lets you see every TMG-approved member in your area.

All Trust My Garage members operate to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) Code of Conduct, meaning you and your vehicle will get the best possible service from a business dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service. If you want to claim against any costs incurred, make sure to keep all invoices and receipts to send off copies when requested.

See it, say it

If there’s a pothole problem you’re concerned about, report it to the relevant authorities. Depending on where the road is changes which organisation you need to inform – here’s what you need to know:

Motorways or major A-roads

  • England: Highways England – although if you hit a pothole in London, inform Transport For London (TFL)
  • Wales: Trunk Road Agents
  • Scotland: Transport Scotland

If the pothole is on a smaller road, it is the responsibility of the local council, so report it to them.

The .Gov website provides information on which organisation to use based on the location of the pothole in England, and you can contact your local council via their website or telephone number to report an issue.

Making a claim

If a pothole has damaged your vehicle you can make a claim to attempt to recoup the costs of any damage incurred. Most councils and highway agencies will send you a form when you report the pothole, so fill in as much detail as possible and return this along with copies of any receipts, invoices and photographs taken.

Some authorities may also ask for a copy of a valid MOT certificate for the vehicle, so be sure to have a copy of this included with your paperwork.

However: making a claim isn’t a guarantee of reimbursement. The Highways Act 1980 allows road authorities to decline claims provided they took reasonable steps to make sure the road is maintained, and potholes dealt with quickly. If your claim is thrown out you may have to utilise your insurance policy, but this could affect your no-claims bonus.

Another option is to try to prove that the body responsible for the road did not do a good enough job of road repairs. One way of doing this is to ask the road authority for details of repairs to the road that damaged your car, or do so through the Freedom of Information Act.

The latter can take 20 working days, but if you can prove that the road has been neglected it is hard for your claim to be turned down.

Keeping up with your maintenance

Whether you’ve suffered pothole damage or not it’s important to keep your vehicle in in tip-top shape. Whether you need a check-up, service, MOT or repair, you can visit your nearest Trust My Garage member and the CTSI-approved Code of Conduct our members operate to means that you’ll get the best possible service.

For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

How can regular vehicle maintenance save you money?

At Trust My Garage, we believe that regular vehicle maintenance is vital when it comes to ensuring you and your motor get a smooth ride – but what other benefits are there to keeping your vehicle in tip-top shape? We’ve put together some handy information; check it out below!

 

Get regular full services

Getting your car serviced each year – and maintaining it between services – is money well spent. Problems are likely to be caught early on when they’re cheaper to fix, and your car will have a better resale value and longer life.

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A well-maintained car is also more efficient, so you’ll save money on fuel as well. If you need to claim on a warranty you’ll normally have to show your car’s got a complete service record. (More)

 

Maintain the correct tyre pressure

Experts say up to 20% of your car’s energy consumption relates to its tyres, making them pretty much the single biggest simple-fix factor. And the most important thing you can do to minimise that consumption is ensure your tyres are inflated correctly.

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You can check your tyre pressure by investing in a tyre-pressure gauge or foot pump (most have gauges built in). Alternatively, visit a petrol station forecourt where you can use their electric air pumps.

Your car will have a tyre-pressure chart displayed somewhere – usually in the door frame, inside the fuel-filler cap or in the handbook. Unscrew the dust cap off your tyre’s air valve, place the air pump nozzle over the valve, ensuring it is seated correctly. Once the tyre is inflated correctly, remove the nozzle and replace the dust cap. (More)

 

Utilise your local independent garage

With higher overheads and staff commission, dealerships are nearly always a more expensive choice for servicing and repairs than independent garages. The average rate for franchised dealers is £99 per hour, while independent garages typically charge £56 – saving you £43! (Source: GarageWire; May 2017.)

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If you want find a reputable, local, independent garage operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved Code of Conduct, you can use the Trust My Garage website’s Find a Garage map here.

Our members offer a range of services across the service and repair industry, ensuring you and your vehicle get the best possible service. For more information about Trust My Garage, you can also read our ‘What Trust My Garage code status means to you’ blog post, or visit the Trust My Garage website.

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Vehicle Emissions: What are they and how are they measured under the new MOT Test?

As of May 20th 2018 the MOT test for vehicles in the UK changed – but what does that mean when it comes to emissions? Never fear, Trust My Garage is here with the answers!

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What are emissions?

The Department for Transport (DfT) states that emissions are pollutants created by petrol, diesel and alternatively-fuelled engines. These pollutants are; carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, un-burnt hydrocarbons and particulate matter. The levels of pollutants present in each vehicle can depend on vehicle technology and the state of maintenance of the vehicle – so older cars have a tendency to produce more emissions.

 

Why do emissions matter?

Like all pollutants, they cause immediate and long-term effects on the environment. Car exhausts emit a wide range of gases and solid matter, which has been cited as a cause of global warming, acid rain, environmental damage and human health damage. Engine noise and fuel spills also cause pollution. Nitrous oxide emissions have also been shown to contribute to the depletion of the Ozone layer around the Earth.

 

How is the new MOT test combatting emissions?

The MOT test now includes updates for the amount of emissions a diesel vehicle can produce – with garages also having to update their Diesel Smoke Meters to ensure they meet requirements for testing. Find out what the .Gov website states about emissions testing here.

 

As well as this, if your car is new enough to have a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), evidence that it has been tampered with – or the presence of exhaust smoke of any colour – will now constitute a ‘major’ MOT fault. This will need to be rectified before a pass can be issued.

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What else is being done to help?

Over time, vehicle manufacturers have realised the importance of emissions and pollution for the environment. The ‘Euro 6’ emission standard has provided a benchmark form of legislation, and as of September 2015 all mass-produced cars sold from this date need to meet the set requirements. The aim of Euro 6 is to reduce levels of harmful car and van exhaust emissions, both in petrol and diesel cars.

 

Emissions of air quality pollutants from road vehicles have been reduced by improving the quality of fuels and by setting increasingly stringent emission limits for new vehicles. As an example, it would take 50 new cars to produce the same quantity of air quality pollutant emissions per kilometre as a vehicle made in 1970.

 

How can motorists help?

When you’re driving you may not think about the impact your vehicle could be having on the environment – but if you’re concerned about reducing the effects of pollution, there are some very simple tips to utilise:

Drive Steadily – hard acceleration and braking forces your vehicle to work harder, creating more emissions from your exhaust.

Don’t overload – the additional weight will require you to use extra power. This means that your engine is using more fuel to accommodate the extra kilos.

Have regular services – By keeping your vehicle well maintained you can ensure all its internal parts are working efficiently, putting less stress on your motor and the environment! Don’t forget, you can book a service and find your nearest Trust My Garage member here with our ‘Find a Garage’ map.

Stretch your legs – if you feel comfortable walking or cycling, then do so! Leaving your vehicle at home means it definitely can’t emit any pollutants.

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Keeping up with your maintenance

If you want to keep your vehicle in tip-top shape, you can visit your nearest Trust My Garage member. Whether it’s a check-up, service, MOT or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service.

 

For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

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The MOT Test is changing – but how will it affect your vehicle?

The MOT test is set to change on 20 May 2018, with new defect types, stricter rules for diesel car emissions, and some vehicles over 40 years old becoming exempt.

Trust My Garage has previously covered what areas of your vehicle are looked at during an MOT, but the upcoming changes will affect cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles – so what do you need to know?

The .Gov website specifies that there are 5 main changes that motorists need to know about. Here’s the breakdown of each change:

 

  1. Defects will be categorised differently

Defects found during the MOT will be categorised as either:

  • dangerous
  • major
  • minor

The category the MOT tester gives each item will depend on the type of problem and how serious it is.

MOT testers will still give advice about items you need to monitor. These are known as ‘advisories’.

 

  1. Stricter rules for diesel car emissions

There will be stricter limits for emissions from diesel cars with a diesel particulate filter (DPF).

A DPF captures and stores exhaust soot to reduce emissions from diesel cars. Your vehicle will get a major fault if the MOT tester:

  • can see smoke of any colour coming from the exhaust
  • finds evidence that the DPF has been tampered with

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  1. Some new things will be included in the MOT

They include checking:

  • if tyres are obviously underinflated
  • if the brake fluid has been contaminated
  • for fluid leaks posing an environmental risk
  • brake pad warning lights and if brake pads or discs are missing
  • reversing lights on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009
  • headlight washers on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009 (if they have them)
  • daytime running lights on vehicles first used from 1 March 2018 (most of these vehicles will have their first MOT in 2021 when they’re 3 years old)

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There will be other smaller changes to how some items are checked. Your MOT centre will be able to tell you about these.

 

  1. The MOT certificate will change

The design of the MOT certificate will change. It will list any defects under the new categories, so they’re clear and easy to understand. The service to check the MOT history of a vehicle will be updated to reflect the changes.

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The old MOT certificate (left) and the updated version as of May 20th (right)

 

  1. Some vehicles over 40 years old won’t need an MOT

Cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles won’t need to have an MOT if they’re over 40 years old and have not been substantially changed.

At the moment, only vehicles first built before 1960 are exempt from needing an MOT. When the rules change on 20 May 2018, vehicles won’t need an MOT from the 40th anniversary of when they were registered. You can check the date the vehicle was registered online.

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You won’t have to apply to stop getting an MOT for your vehicle. However, each time you tax your historic vehicle (even if you don’t pay a fee), you’ll have to declare it meets the rules for not needing an MOT.

 

More information

The maximum fees MOT centres can charge won’t change, and you can get a free MOT reminder by text message or email a month before your MOT is due via the .Gov website.

All MOT station have been issued with a special notice and will be aware of the upcoming changes to the MOT test. Most Trust My Garage members conduct MOTs, and will adhere to the new regulations when they come into force on Sunday 20th May. If you have further questions you can visit the .Gov website, call the DVSA MOT Hub on 0300 123 9000 or visit your local Trust My Garage member for face-to-face updates.

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If you’re looking to give your motor some TLC, you can take your vehicle to your nearest Trust My Garage member business. Whether it’s for an MOT, check-up, service or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service. For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

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Give your car a Spring in its step with Trust My Garage

The end of winter is finally in sight! At Trust My Garage, we’re preparing our vehicles for the Spring season with some top maintenance and driving tips designed to see you through to the long days of Summer.

 

Whether you’re looking for driving, maintenance or plain cleaning tips, we’ve put together some advice to help you make the most of your motor. Take a look at our handy info list below – and be sure to let us know in the comments if you give any of our methods a try!

 

Give your car some love

 

With warmer weather on the way, people like to travel to more! It’s important that the inside of your car is a safe and clean environment for you and any passengers you may have.

Next time you get a chance to wash your car, you could also make sure your footwells are clear of any rubbish or obstructions, give your dashboard and centre console a dust and – if you have the opportunity – try to give your car a hoover out to clean out any debris that gathered over the winter months.

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Beware of low Sun

 

Much like Autumn, the sun is still low in the sky during Spring. Having the sun shining at you while driving can not only damage your eyesight, but could lead to an accident due to poor vision. Be sure to drive with your sun visor down and/or wear quality sunglasses to improve your vision of the roads when necessary.

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Check your medication

 

The onset on Spring can also lead to an onset of allergies for some motorists. If you take any medication and drive, please be sure to check with your pharmacist or doctor for any potentially detrimental side effects such as drowsiness. If you feel that any medication will impact your driving negatively, do not drive until you feel comfortable behind the wheel.

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Watch out for other road users

 

Good weather can lead to a plethora of additional road users – so be sure to be a courteous driver! Cyclists, horse and riders and walkers can all become additional road hazards, so be sure to take care when driving, especially if you’re in an unfamiliar area.

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Keep an eye on the road conditions

 

After winter, the UK’s roads can suffer from an influx of additional potholes, created by the wet and cold conditions of the chilly season. Large potholes can do serious damage to a vehicle, so where safe and possible avoid them, or drive cautiously to try and counteract any adverse effects on your motor.

Spring showers are still a definite possibility, so take care on wet roads and leave additional distance and braking time between you and any vehicles ahead. Be careful of any puddles on the road too, as water in your engine makes for neither a happy car or driver!

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Get your car ready for the road

 

If your car is due for an MOT or service, make sure to take it in to a garage to get it ready for the road. If you’re looking for a reputable, local, independent garage you can head to the Trust My Garage website and use our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map to locate your nearest TMG member, operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved code of conduct.

 

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If you have any tips of your own for getting ready for Spring, be sure to let us know in the comments below!

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New Year, New Motoring Resolutions

2018 is upon us! The start of the new year means many people across the UK are kickstarting their January with a range of New Year’s resolutions – and motorists are no exception. This year, drivers are looking to reboot their motoring habits in a bid to revamp both their vehicles and their attitudes to driving.

 

A new survey has shown the variety of ways in which motorists want to put more effort into vehicle maintenance and their driving styles – but which of these resolutions will be yours?

 

Checking tyre pressures and oil levels regularly

In the poll, 24 per cent of drivers said they wanted to improve how frequently they check their tyre pressures and oil levels. Both of these areas are hugely important in your vehicle; as maintaining correct tyre pressure ensures good fuel efficiency, better road safety in poor weather conditions and more even wear across the tyre, reducing the likelihood of bald spots on the tyre. Correct tyre pressures should be listed in your vehicle’s owner’s manual and on the pillar when the driver’s door is open. To inflate your tyres to the correct pressure, many garages and petrol stations offer a tyre pressure inflator on site.

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Having the correct levels of oil in your engine is also of vital importance for your vehicle. Any engine needs lubrication, and making sure your engine is well oiled will fight against two major engine damagers: friction and heat. Measuring your oil level on the dipstick when your vehicle is cool and on level ground will give you an accurate reading of the amount and an indication of the quality of the oil in your motor.

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Learning to park properly

17 per cent of drivers also wanted to learn how to park properly. While many drivers are comfortable driving in to a parking space, some motorists – especially new and/or younger drivers – can feel daunted at the prospect of parallel parking. While practice is the best method for improvement, these tips from the DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) can offer some help for understanding how to parallel park safely and effectively.

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Conquering motorways

The survey found that 16 per cent of drivers were nervous or unhappy about using the motorway in their vehicle. As part of the expansive road network spanning the UK, motorways provide a fast route to almost any destination up and down the country – but the speed and heavy flow of traffic can be an intimidating prospect for a motorist. The Highway Code provides explicit rules of conduct for using the motorway network, but drivers can also use a ‘Pass Plus’ training course with a registered instructor as a practical application to help get them motoring.

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Improving reversing ability

15 per cent of respondents also said they would like to improve their ability to reverse their vehicle. While reversing may seem like a common manoeuvre, some drivers can find it difficult. The Highway Code offers some helpful advice for reversing, along with its other general road use guidelines. Rule 202 states:

 

“Look carefully before you start reversing. You should

  • use all your mirrors
  • check the ‘blind spot’ behind you (the part of the road you cannot see easily in the mirrors)
  • check there are no pedestrians (particularly children), cyclists, other road users or obstructions in the road behind you.

Reverse slowly while

  • checking all around
  • looking mainly through the rear window
  • being aware that the front of your vehicle will swing out as you turn.

Get someone to guide you if you cannot see clearly.”

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Not getting road rage

14 per cent of drivers in the poll admitted to succumbing to road rage when motoring, with a resolution not to give in to the red mist in 2018. While being a confident driver is a definite positive, motorists should not be over confident, as it can be a killer on the roads. The best method for combatting road rage is simply to let any issues go and not let them affect your journey, however we know how difficult that can be! Rule 147 of The Highway Code states:

“Do not allow yourself to become agitated or involved if someone is behaving badly on the road. This will only make the situation worse. Pull over, calm down and, when you feel relaxed, continue your journey.”

So, sit back, relax, and carry on driving in a calm manner for your own safety and that of other road users.

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Switching off phones at the wheel

A shocking 13 per cent of drivers admitted to their resolution being to switch off their mobile phone when behind the wheel. The law states that:

“You can only use a handheld phone if you are safely parked or need to call 999 or 112 in an emergency and it’s unsafe or impractical to stop.”

If you’re caught using a mobile in any other motoring circumstance you’ll receive 6 penalty points on your driving licence and a £200 fine.

 

The simplest solution is to turn off your phone or have it in a locked compartment of your car, and if you feel you need to check your phone pull over at a safe point and switch off your car’s engine. If you need to contact someone and you know they are driving, wait until you know they have arrived at their destination to avoid being a distraction to them.

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Keeping your vehicle in top condition

Maintaining your vehicle should be at the top of your New Year’s Resolutions list, so that you can keep motoring happy throughout 2018. With Trust My Garage, you know you can rely on using a nationally recognised brand, with a truly professional service for both you and your vehicle. All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

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For more information about Trust My Garage you can visit www.trustmygarage.co.uk and to find your nearest Trust My Garage member you can use our handy Find a Garage map.

Got any New Year’s resolutions of your own? Let us know in the comments!

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