Category Archives: MOTs

Don’t get spooked about vehicle maintenance this Halloween with Trust My Garage

October 31st is coming and it’s the spookiest day of the year – Halloween! Not only is it time for ghouls and ghosts to make an appearance, it’s also time to prepare your vehicle for the upcoming cold winter months. Want to know how? Find out with the Trust My Garage blog by reading on – and for a little bit of fun, don’t forget to count up our spooky puns throughout this post and leave us a comment with how many you can find!

Beware the witchy weather

The onset of autumn and winter means poorer road conditions for motorists – summer showers have given way to winter whirlwinds! Low winter sun can dazzle unprepared drivers, and heavy rain and fog can create slippery roads and reduced visibility.

In wet conditions allow additional travel time and drive at a speed appropriate to the conditions, be aware that braking distances can double on wet roads and increase tenfold on ice!

Avoid a fright at night

It’s important for drivers to take it steady when driving in the dark, especially if you’re driving in an unfamiliar area.

Broken or faulty lights can result in a £50 fine, three penalty points and even a Roadside Prohibition Notice – which means you must fix the fault before a re-inspection – so be sure to take the time to walk around your vehicle and check all your lights are functional before setting off on any trips.

If you’re new to driving it may be worth practicing your evening driving in a familiar area before heading off on longer trips – getting hours of practice under your belt may help with your confidence and help you get used to driving in poor lighting!

Don’t let your wheels be tyre-rifying

With poorer driving conditions on their way it’s important to ensure your tyres are up to the challenge – so be sure to check your tyre pressures and tread depth regularly. The legal minimum for tread depth is 1.6mm, but tyre grip can deteriorate rapidly if the depth is under 3mm.

You can use the edge of a 20p coin to check how deep your tread is – if the outer band of the coin is visible, then your tyres may be illegal and unsafe and should be checked immediately by a qualified tyre professional. Illegal tyres can earn you three penalty points and a fine of up to £2,500 per tyre!

For the correct tyre pressures for your vehicle consult your Owner’s Manual or look for a tyre information sticker which could be located on one of the door pillars or inside the fuel flap. One of these should contain the information you need for your tyres to be inflated to the correct PSI/BAR. Air and water machines are commonplace at petrol stations across the UK – or you can ask your local Trust My Garage member to check your pressure is correct, if you’re unsure of how to do this yourself.

Keep your bat-tery flying

On  average, car batteries last up to 5 years (source), but there are many reasons that a battery could require replacing  sooner than this.

Heading into colder weather can cause strain on your battery, as can short repetitive journeys – with lots of stopping and starting of the engine which can drain a battery’s power without giving it enough time to recharge fully. Also; the use of a heated rear window, lights and wipers all add to the load placed on a battery. Taking your car out for a longer drive at the weekend can be a key factor in combating battery drain, as can recharging your battery at home or at a local garage. If you are concerned about the condition of your battery your friendly TMG member could always check it out for you!

Take a trip to the fuel pump-kin

Running out of fuel is one of the most common causes of breakdown on the UK’s motorway network, so check you’ve got enough fuel for your trip and take note of any available fuel stations en-route to fill up as necessary. It’s also wise to allow sufficient fuel to be able to accommodate any delays that may occur on route.

If you aren’t sure of places to fill up on y our trips, you can use an internet search engine to locate nearby fuel stations or ask a local in the area where the nearest fuel station is. Some modern sat navs also highlight close by fuel stations but you may need to turn this function on in your model’s settings where possible!

Avoid an MOT horror with Trust My Garage

If your car is due its MOT or a service, make sure to take it in to a garage to keep it roadworthy. If you’re looking for a reputable, local, independent garage you can rely on, head to the Trust My Garage website and use our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map to locate your nearest TMG member, operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved code of conduct.

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs.

Trust My Garage truly is the independent scheme for independent garages in the UK. They have each signed up to treat customers and their vehicle with respect, which means they really do exist to ensure that independent garage standards are continuing to improve.

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

Trust My Garage – the network of quality independent garages you can trust

What is Trust My Garage?

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service. All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations.

If you take your vehicle for an MOT, service or repair at your local garage, how can you be sure of the quality of its work? At Trust My Garage, we truly believe that our members are the best independent garages in the UK, each one unique but all skilled professionals who are dedicated to providing top quality work.

 

Why should I choose a Trust My Garage member?

Since 2016 Trust My Garage members have all operated to a strict Code of Conduct, which has been approved by the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) – the national body for trading standards professionals. Trust My Garage is currently the only CTSI backed code exclusively for independent garages, so you can rest assured that you are dealing with a firm that is determined to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction.

 

Why can I Trust My Garage?

All Trust My Garage members operate to the TMG ‘Code of Practice for Service and Repair’, as well as utilising our Customer Charter:

As every TMG member adheres to our strict criteria, you can rest assured that you can Trust My Garage for great service, every time.

 

Where can I find my nearest Trust My Garage member?

With over 2,900 members across the UK, you’re never far away from a TMG member. We’ve even created a handy search function so you can locate your nearest TMG-approved garage with ease!

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs.

Try it out here:

 

What happens if there is an issue with a garage?

If a customer does enter a dispute with a Trust My Garage member, our CTSI Code of Conduct offers a robust complaints procedure. We use an impartial Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR) provider to ensure a fair outcome in every case.

How can I find out more about Trust My Garage?

If you’re looking for more information about Trust My Garage, you can head over to our website, TrustMyGarage.co.uk. We’re also on social media, so you can get the latest motoring news and updates straight into your social feeds! Check out our profiles:

Trust My Garage Facebook Trust My Garage Twitter

As of this week, you’ll also be seeing more of Trust My Garage with the launch of our debut TV advert! We want motorists in the UK to Trust My Garage – so be sure to keep an eye out for the Trust My Garage shield on your screens. You can also view our advert right here, so watch the video below and see why you can Trust My Garage:

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

Like our new advert? Make sure to leave us a comment in the section below!

Vehicle safety recalls – what are they and how can they affect motorists?

Motoring in the UK requires drivers to meet a variety of rules and regulations – but what happens when a manufacturer discovers an issue with your vehicle? Trust My Garage has all the information you need when it comes to ensuring your vehicle is safe; check it out below!

 

What is a vehicle safety recall?

A vehicle recall happens when a manufacturer identifies an issue with a particular make or model of vehicle – sometimes they affect a small number of vehicles, and sometimes it’s a much wider range depending on the issue.

In the UK alone, it’s not unusual for a single recall to apply to 100,000 cars or more, sometimes from more than one manufacturer. Worldwide, the biggest ever recall was for 14 million vehicles (carried out by Ford in 2009).

The DVSA estimates around 2.39 million UK cars – around one in 13 – currently in use have unresolved safety recalls that have been issued jointly by the government department and manufacturers.

While there are some instances that will cause owners concern – such as the Vauxhall Zafira fires or Toyota and Lexus airbags, for the most part recalls are for smaller fixes to ensure reliability or, in the case of the VW emissions scandal, create compliance with emissions regulations.

 

How can I be made aware of a recall?

After determining what needs recalling, the manufacturer registers the issue with the DVSA, who then authorise the DVLA to provide contact details of all current owners.

From these, manufacturers can then write, email or call vehicle owners to make them aware of an outstanding recall on their vehicle and advise them on how to proceed.

 

What if I want to check for a recall myself?

The DVSA website has a function where motorists can check their car’s MOT history, and they have now added a “Recall Checker” function to their service. All you need is the vehicle registration – test it out at https://www.check-mot.service.gov.uk/.

If there is an outstanding recall on the vehicle you are searching for the information below will be provided and you will be advised to contact your nearest dealership to conduct an assessment:

If there is no recall on your vehicle, the checker will display the below message:

If there isn’t a recall for your vehicle, you don’t have to do anything!

 

If there’s a recall for my vehicle what do I do?

You can book in an appointment with the manufacturer franchised dealer of your choice – just tell them you need an appointment for a recall and provide them with your vehicle’s details at a time convenient for you.

Depending on the severity of the recall, your car could be back to you within five minutes or across the span of several hours, but your chosen garage should be able to advise you on an approximate timescale so you can plan accordingly.

At the most extreme end of the scale, the manufacturer might instruct you not to drive your car until the work has been completed, but this is rare. Porsche took this decision when two of its £100,000 911 GT3 models caught fire. After telling owners not to use their cars, it traced the problem and set about fitting every car it sold with a new engine. This is, however, a highly unlikely possibility for most motorists.

 

How much could a recall cost me?

As recalls are issues identified by a manufacturer any work should be carried out free of charge, no matter how much time has passed since the recall was initially issued.

 

What happens if I don’t fix the issue?

There is currently no legal mandate for owners to have recalls resolved, but the DVSA has been discussing the option of including vehicle recall checks as part of the mandatory annual MOT, with failures for vehicles that are subject to outstanding recalls that haven’t been addressed.

Owners are also responsible for the condition of their vehicle and can be subject to fines and the invalidation of their insurance if found to be driving a vehicle in a dangerous condition.

 

What can I do about general maintenance for my car?

If you want find a reputable, local, independent garage operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved Code of Conduct, you can use the Trust My Garage website’s Find a Garage map here.

Our members offer a range of services across the service and repair industry, ensuring you and your vehicle get the best possible service. For more information about Trust My Garage visit the Trust My Garage website – and  be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

Don’t put off your garage visit – here’s how to get in to gear and book your first MOT

A new survey has revealed that a fifth of drivers aged 17 to 25 have admitted to putting off taking their car in for repairs or servicing – so why are young motorists avoiding a visit to the garage?

 

The survey showed that over two-fifths (43 per cent) said their biggest worry was the cost of repairs, but 19 per cent also said they were worried about not understanding what the mechanic was saying and 17 per cent said they felt intimidated. (source)

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Trust My Garage is here to help you make sure you’re getting the best out of your visit to a garage – so read on to learn how you can make sure you’re satisfied with every step of your experience!

 

Getting your MOT booked in

When it’s time for your first MOT it can be an intimidating experience, especially if you don’t know where to start with finding a reputable garage. With Trust My Garage all our members adhere to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved Code of Conduct, meaning you know that you’re visiting an independent garage that will uphold the highest levels of service for you and your vehicle.

 

To find your nearest TMG member, you can use our ‘Find a Garage’ map. This handy tool allows you to input your postcode and find your nearest Trust My Garage member, and you can even read honest reviews from other customers of a garage to see what they’re like! If you decide you want to contact a garage, all their details are displayed so you can take whatever information you need.

 

Taking your vehicle for an MOT

Visiting a garage for the first time can seem like a scary prospect – but the staff are there to help you! A regular MOT will give your car an MOT certificate, with all the necessary information about your car listed for you to read, as below: 

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There’s a maximum amount MOT test stations can charge. This depends on the type of vehicle. The maximum fee for a car is £54.85 and £29.65 for a standard motorcycle. Any other work that your vehicle needs on top of the standard MOT will cost extra – but if it’s minor or advisory you can have it repaired shortly after your MOT (if necessary) instead of at the same time.
Your certificate also lists any defects under the new categories, so they’re clear and easy to understand. These are how the new categories can affect you: 

mot defect categories

If you drive your vehicle without a valid MOT, you can be fined up to £1,000 – and that’s a cost that nobody wants!

 

Understanding issues and repairs to your vehicle

If your vehicle has had to undertake any kind of repair work, the garage you use should be able to explain what has happened to the vehicle and how it can be/has been repaired. If you aren’t sure about any information, ask! Technicians understand that most motorists aren’t as clued-up to the inner workings of a vehicle as they may be and should be able to describe – or even show you – where an issue has arisen or has been fixed. It might seem silly to ask but if it helps you know what’s going on with your car, a professional should be happy to provide as much detail as they can.

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Keeping your vehicle healthy

When it comes to motor maintenance, there is some simple advice: Don’t ignore warning lights and other indications that something isn’t right. Waiting until your MOT is due to fix these can result in a costly surprise! The best way to ensure the health of your car and its roadworthiness is to address mechanical problems as they arise. If you need to familiarise yourself with dashboard symbols, you can always take a look at our “Getting to know your vehicle’s dashboard” blog post, or by reading your vehicle’s Owner Manual.

 

For more general issues, you can also read our “How can regular vehicle maintenance save you money?” blog post for some ideas on how to ensure your vehicle is kept running in tip-top condition – and how to make sure you don’t spend a fortune! 

 

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

 

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who must comply with a strict code of practice. Every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for your money.

 

Visit www.TRUSTMYGARAGE.co.uk and type in your postcode to find your nearest trusted independent garage.

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Vehicle Emissions: What are they and how are they measured under the new MOT Test?

As of May 20th 2018 the MOT test for vehicles in the UK changed – but what does that mean when it comes to emissions? Never fear, Trust My Garage is here with the answers!

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What are emissions?

The Department for Transport (DfT) states that emissions are pollutants created by petrol, diesel and alternatively-fuelled engines. These pollutants are; carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, un-burnt hydrocarbons and particulate matter. The levels of pollutants present in each vehicle can depend on vehicle technology and the state of maintenance of the vehicle – so older cars have a tendency to produce more emissions.

 

Why do emissions matter?

Like all pollutants, they cause immediate and long-term effects on the environment. Car exhausts emit a wide range of gases and solid matter, which has been cited as a cause of global warming, acid rain, environmental damage and human health damage. Engine noise and fuel spills also cause pollution. Nitrous oxide emissions have also been shown to contribute to the depletion of the Ozone layer around the Earth.

 

How is the new MOT test combatting emissions?

The MOT test now includes updates for the amount of emissions a diesel vehicle can produce – with garages also having to update their Diesel Smoke Meters to ensure they meet requirements for testing. Find out what the .Gov website states about emissions testing here.

 

As well as this, if your car is new enough to have a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), evidence that it has been tampered with – or the presence of exhaust smoke of any colour – will now constitute a ‘major’ MOT fault. This will need to be rectified before a pass can be issued.

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What else is being done to help?

Over time, vehicle manufacturers have realised the importance of emissions and pollution for the environment. The ‘Euro 6’ emission standard has provided a benchmark form of legislation, and as of September 2015 all mass-produced cars sold from this date need to meet the set requirements. The aim of Euro 6 is to reduce levels of harmful car and van exhaust emissions, both in petrol and diesel cars.

 

Emissions of air quality pollutants from road vehicles have been reduced by improving the quality of fuels and by setting increasingly stringent emission limits for new vehicles. As an example, it would take 50 new cars to produce the same quantity of air quality pollutant emissions per kilometre as a vehicle made in 1970.

 

How can motorists help?

When you’re driving you may not think about the impact your vehicle could be having on the environment – but if you’re concerned about reducing the effects of pollution, there are some very simple tips to utilise:

Drive Steadily – hard acceleration and braking forces your vehicle to work harder, creating more emissions from your exhaust.

Don’t overload – the additional weight will require you to use extra power. This means that your engine is using more fuel to accommodate the extra kilos.

Have regular services – By keeping your vehicle well maintained you can ensure all its internal parts are working efficiently, putting less stress on your motor and the environment! Don’t forget, you can book a service and find your nearest Trust My Garage member here with our ‘Find a Garage’ map.

Stretch your legs – if you feel comfortable walking or cycling, then do so! Leaving your vehicle at home means it definitely can’t emit any pollutants.

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Keeping up with your maintenance

If you want to keep your vehicle in tip-top shape, you can visit your nearest Trust My Garage member. Whether it’s a check-up, service, MOT or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service.

 

For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

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The MOT Test is changing – but how will it affect your vehicle?

The MOT test is set to change on 20 May 2018, with new defect types, stricter rules for diesel car emissions, and some vehicles over 40 years old becoming exempt.

Trust My Garage has previously covered what areas of your vehicle are looked at during an MOT, but the upcoming changes will affect cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles – so what do you need to know?

The .Gov website specifies that there are 5 main changes that motorists need to know about. Here’s the breakdown of each change:

 

  1. Defects will be categorised differently

Defects found during the MOT will be categorised as either:

  • dangerous
  • major
  • minor

The category the MOT tester gives each item will depend on the type of problem and how serious it is.

MOT testers will still give advice about items you need to monitor. These are known as ‘advisories’.

 

  1. Stricter rules for diesel car emissions

There will be stricter limits for emissions from diesel cars with a diesel particulate filter (DPF).

A DPF captures and stores exhaust soot to reduce emissions from diesel cars. Your vehicle will get a major fault if the MOT tester:

  • can see smoke of any colour coming from the exhaust
  • finds evidence that the DPF has been tampered with

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  1. Some new things will be included in the MOT

They include checking:

  • if tyres are obviously underinflated
  • if the brake fluid has been contaminated
  • for fluid leaks posing an environmental risk
  • brake pad warning lights and if brake pads or discs are missing
  • reversing lights on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009
  • headlight washers on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009 (if they have them)
  • daytime running lights on vehicles first used from 1 March 2018 (most of these vehicles will have their first MOT in 2021 when they’re 3 years old)

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There will be other smaller changes to how some items are checked. Your MOT centre will be able to tell you about these.

 

  1. The MOT certificate will change

The design of the MOT certificate will change. It will list any defects under the new categories, so they’re clear and easy to understand. The service to check the MOT history of a vehicle will be updated to reflect the changes.

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The old MOT certificate (left) and the updated version as of May 20th (right)

 

  1. Some vehicles over 40 years old won’t need an MOT

Cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles won’t need to have an MOT if they’re over 40 years old and have not been substantially changed.

At the moment, only vehicles first built before 1960 are exempt from needing an MOT. When the rules change on 20 May 2018, vehicles won’t need an MOT from the 40th anniversary of when they were registered. You can check the date the vehicle was registered online.

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You won’t have to apply to stop getting an MOT for your vehicle. However, each time you tax your historic vehicle (even if you don’t pay a fee), you’ll have to declare it meets the rules for not needing an MOT.

 

More information

The maximum fees MOT centres can charge won’t change, and you can get a free MOT reminder by text message or email a month before your MOT is due via the .Gov website.

All MOT station have been issued with a special notice and will be aware of the upcoming changes to the MOT test. Most Trust My Garage members conduct MOTs, and will adhere to the new regulations when they come into force on Sunday 20th May. If you have further questions you can visit the .Gov website, call the DVSA MOT Hub on 0300 123 9000 or visit your local Trust My Garage member for face-to-face updates.

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If you’re looking to give your motor some TLC, you can take your vehicle to your nearest Trust My Garage member business. Whether it’s for an MOT, check-up, service or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service. For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

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What to do when… Your motor needs an MOT

The MOT is a mandatory annual requirement for vehicles in the UK – but how do you go about organising yours, and how does it benefit your vehicle?

 

If you’re feeling a little bit lost when it comes to the process, Trust My Garage has put together some top tips and advice on how to ensure you’re meeting the legal requirements and giving your motor some TLC at the same time.

 

While this information is currently up to date, the MOT test will change on 20th May 2018. Some new things will be included, defects will be categorised differently, there will be stricter rules for car emissions and diesel vehicles, and some vehicles over 40 years old won’t need an MOT. Look out for our blog post detailing the changes coming soon.

 

How do I know when my MOT is due?

Your car must undertake its first MOT three years after its first registration, and then every year after that. If you need to know when your MOT is due, you can sign up to the new .GOV MOT reminder service. This will provide you with a reminder one month before your MOT is due. You’ll get another reminder if you still haven’t had your vehicle tested 2 weeks before your MOT is due.

 

Ok, I know when my MOT needs to be completed – now what?

You can take your vehicle to any registered MOT testing station that provides tests on your class of vehicle. If you have a car, this will be Classes 4 & 7 and for motorcycles it’s Classes 1 & 2. MOT stations should have a sign outside that looks like this:

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This sign shows that the station has been approved by the DVSA as fit to carry out MOT tests, and you will be able to take your vehicle there to have the test completed.

 

How do I find an MOT Testing Station near me?

With over 22,000 MOT Stations operating in Great Britain, there’s plenty of choice to be had! If you’re looking for a trusted independent garage near to you, most Trust My Garage members are approved MOT stations. You can use TMG’s handy Find a Garage map to locate a garage that adheres to a Chartered Trading Standards (CTSI)-approved code of conduct. The Trust My Garage shield acts as a badge of quality for the independent garage sector, and demonstrates the commitment our garages follow to provide the highest levels of workmanship and customer service.

 

So, I’ve had my vehicle MOT’ed, but how does it help?

The MOT covers many aspects of vehicle safety and roadworthiness, as well as conducting compulsory exhaust emissions tests. At the end of the test, you will receive a certificate proving your vehicle has passed or details on why your vehicle has failed, as well as an advisory information provided by the qualified MOT Tester. Have a look at the photo below to see the areas covered in the test for cars:

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For a more in-depth breakdown of all the parts of your car looked at during the MOT, you can have a look at the full government list here.

 

Right. I’ve had a service though, is that the same thing?

Simply put, no. The MOT does not cover the condition of the engine, clutch or gearbox, which are the parts of your car that will be looked at during a service. A yearly service is also NOT mandatory, but is strongly recommended to help keep your vehicle in roadworthy condition. Many motorists opt to have their MOT and service conducted at the same time, as it means any issues can be detected and rectified in one appointment.

 

But my car looks fine, so why would it even need an MOT?

While it’s true that your car may look fine at a glance, when was the last time you checked the tread on your tyres? Do you know the proper depth it needs to be at to be road safe? Do you think your brakes are as responsive as when you first got your car? Are the electrics still safe and functioning properly? The MOT is designed to ensure your vehicle is as safe as possible when you drive it, and lets you know if there are any problems before they become a real danger to you and other road users.

 

Thanks! Remind me, where can I get my vehicle MOT’ed again?

No problem – you can take your vehicle to your nearest Trust My Garage member business. Whether it’s for an MOT, check-up, service or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service. For more information you can visit www.TrustMyGarage.co.uk – and be sure to check out the Trust My Garage Facebook and Twitter pages too!

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Give your car a Spring in its step with Trust My Garage

The end of winter is finally in sight! At Trust My Garage, we’re preparing our vehicles for the Spring season with some top maintenance and driving tips designed to see you through to the long days of Summer.

 

Whether you’re looking for driving, maintenance or plain cleaning tips, we’ve put together some advice to help you make the most of your motor. Take a look at our handy info list below – and be sure to let us know in the comments if you give any of our methods a try!

 

Give your car some love

 

With warmer weather on the way, people like to travel to more! It’s important that the inside of your car is a safe and clean environment for you and any passengers you may have.

Next time you get a chance to wash your car, you could also make sure your footwells are clear of any rubbish or obstructions, give your dashboard and centre console a dust and – if you have the opportunity – try to give your car a hoover out to clean out any debris that gathered over the winter months.

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Beware of low Sun

 

Much like Autumn, the sun is still low in the sky during Spring. Having the sun shining at you while driving can not only damage your eyesight, but could lead to an accident due to poor vision. Be sure to drive with your sun visor down and/or wear quality sunglasses to improve your vision of the roads when necessary.

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Check your medication

 

The onset on Spring can also lead to an onset of allergies for some motorists. If you take any medication and drive, please be sure to check with your pharmacist or doctor for any potentially detrimental side effects such as drowsiness. If you feel that any medication will impact your driving negatively, do not drive until you feel comfortable behind the wheel.

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Watch out for other road users

 

Good weather can lead to a plethora of additional road users – so be sure to be a courteous driver! Cyclists, horse and riders and walkers can all become additional road hazards, so be sure to take care when driving, especially if you’re in an unfamiliar area.

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Keep an eye on the road conditions

 

After winter, the UK’s roads can suffer from an influx of additional potholes, created by the wet and cold conditions of the chilly season. Large potholes can do serious damage to a vehicle, so where safe and possible avoid them, or drive cautiously to try and counteract any adverse effects on your motor.

Spring showers are still a definite possibility, so take care on wet roads and leave additional distance and braking time between you and any vehicles ahead. Be careful of any puddles on the road too, as water in your engine makes for neither a happy car or driver!

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Get your car ready for the road

 

If your car is due for an MOT or service, make sure to take it in to a garage to get it ready for the road. If you’re looking for a reputable, local, independent garage you can head to the Trust My Garage website and use our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map to locate your nearest TMG member, operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved code of conduct.

 

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If you have any tips of your own for getting ready for Spring, be sure to let us know in the comments below!

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Common sense has prevailed: The 3-1-1 MOT is to remain unchanged!

In January last year, the UK government announced it was creating a consultation which could possibly extend the time allowed before the first MOT of a vehicle’s life from three years to four then annually thereafter – known as the 4-1-1 system.

 

At the time, Trust My Garage wrote extensively on why the 4-1-1 system was dangerous in a blog post, viewable here.

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We are now happy to announce that as of January 18th 2018, the outcome of the consultation – based upon public and automotive industry opinion – was that the government has cancelled any plans to extend the time before a vehicle’s first MOT.

Upon the announcement of the consultation last year, Trust My Garage stated:

“If a vehicle has a defect by its third year of use, then extending the MOT for a further year will also have the effect of increasing the number of defects the vehicle carries, because defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then snowball and cause defects with the related components in the vehicle. Not only is this dangerous for motorists, but it could also be costly as minor repairs that could be fixed in the third year could become major defects by the fourth.”

 

According to the consultation’s respondents, much of the public agreed. Most respondents were against the proposals on safety grounds, arguing that the savings to motorists were outweighed by the risk to road users and the test often highlights upcoming issues affecting the vehicle. A public survey for the Department for Transport by Populus also showed fewer than half of people were in favour of the change.

 

Jesse Norman, Roads Minister, said: “Although modern cars are better built and safer than when the MOT test was last changed 50 years ago, there has been a clear public concern that any further changes don’t put people’s lives at risk. We are looking at further research to ensure the MOT test evolves with the demands of modern motoring.”

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Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test in 2015 and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined. (DVSA, 2015) Along with this, more than 770,000 vehicles were discovered to have a dangerous defect in 2013/14, equating to nearly 2,200 every day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment. (DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008)

 

To read the full results of the consultation click here.

To find out more about why changes to an MOT’s frequency would be a danger to both vehicles and road users, take a look at the ProMOTe website here.

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If your vehicle is due for an MOT or you feel it needs a bit of maintenance, why not visit the Trust My Garage website and find a trusted independent garage in your area? Click here to use our handy Find a Garage map to find your nearest member. If you aren’t when your vehicle’s MOT is due, The DVSA have created a new MOT Reminder Service. To arrange your e-mail reminder, click here.

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Why is the MOT so important for vehicles?

Every year from the age of three your car should, by law, go in for an MOT test. But what exactly does the MOT do and why are they so important?

 

What even is an MOT?

During an MOT, the most important parts of your vehicle are “checked to make sure they meet the legal standards” (Gov). By having an MOT, you’re making sure that your car is safe to drive on UK roads. It’s called an MOT because it was originally named after the original Ministry of Transport (MoT). (source)

 

But I’ve had my car serviced, isn’t that the same?

Simply put, no. The MOT does not cover the condition of the engine, clutch or gearbox, which are the parts of your car that will be looked at during a service. The MOT looks at mechanical parts of your car and emissions as well. 

 

Ok, so what parts of my car does the MOT look at?

The MOT provides you with an evaluation on the condition of most of your car, such as bodywork, fuel, seats, brakes and tyres. For a more in-depth breakdown of all the parts of your car looked at during the MOT, you can have a look at the full government list here, or take a look at the photo below.

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Car parts looked at during the MOT (source)

So why is the MOT so important for my car?

Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test last year and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined. (DVSA, 2015) Even with a regular test every year, that’s still just under 11 million vehicles that aren’t fit to drive on UK roads.

With the Government opening their new consultation about extending the time before a car’s first MOT, it’s important to think about how many more dangerous vehicles – which could be over 3 and a half million! – that could be around in just one extra year’s time. 

 

 

Wait, the government want to do what?

Yes, you read that right. The government have opened a public consultation asking for opinions on whether a car should be able to wait 4 years for its first MOT, instead of 3. It’s being called the 4-1-1 system, and while it might seem like a good idea, the facts say otherwise. There is a belief that because modern cars are more reliable, they do not need to be tested so strictly. In practice this is incorrect. Not only is the current MOT failure rate higher than it was in 2008 (when vehicles were less reliable), components designed to wear out – like tyres and brakes – are far more likely to have become dangerous by the time the vehicle is four years old. 

 

But an extra year with no MOT would save me money, right?

Well, that isn’t exactly the case. Extending the time allowed before the first MOT of a car or motorcycle’s life from three years to four would likely prove more expensive for motorists, as it would raise the likelihood that minor problems become more serious defects – which then triggers in turn further defects which require more significant and more costly repairs later. It may also be the case that defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then result in defects in different but associated components which would otherwise have remained serviceable. The defects are therefore cumulative – which could cost you even more money. 

 

But my car looks fine, so why would it even need an MOT?

While it’s true that your car may look fine at a glance, when was the last time you checked the tread on your tyres? Do you know the proper depth it needs to be at to be road safe? Do you think your brakes are as responsive as when you first got your car? Are the electrics still safe and functioning properly? The MOT is designed to ensure your vehicle is as safe as possible when you drive it, and lets you know if there are any problems before they become a real danger to you and other road users. 

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Surely it can’t be that much of a problem though?

That’s where you’re wrong. In 2013/14 there were more than 770,000 vehicles discovered during MOT tests with a dangerous defect. Nearly 2,200 EVERY day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment (DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008). Now, when you go out on to the roads, do you want over 2,000 chances of being in an accident due to a dangerous car?

 

You’re right, that’s bad! But what can I do to stop it happening?

For a start, you can take your vehicle for its yearly MOT, to make sure it’s in the best possible condition. If you’re looking for a garage that will carry out a thorough, DVSA standard MOT you can find your nearest trusted independent garage on the Trust My Garage website. All the garages are Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved and are ready to do the best work for you and your vehicle. 

You can also head over proMOTe’s website if you’re looking for some more facts, or you can to the Government website and take a look at the MOT consultation yourself. It’s open for response from all members of the public, so if you think it’s a bad idea, like we do, let the government know!

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