Category Archives: Green Driving

Diesel Scrappage: What is it all about?

In recent weeks there has been much talk about diesel emissions and how they are affecting pollution levels around the globe. Diesel engine vehicles are one of the main causes of concern for pollution levels, especially on the back of the Dieselgate scandal, where Volkswagen pleaded guilty in the US to allegations they hid true vehicle emission levels during emissions testing.

Despite the new technology being used in electric and hybrid vehicles, as well as average petrol cars, hundreds of thousands of daily use vehicles are powered by diesel engines, as they are seen to be the most fuel efficient. So, in the face of a potential oncoming vendetta against diesel as a fuel, what can UK motorists do?

diesel ex

Diesel emissions are a real problem when it comes to pollution

 

Government Plans

The British government are currently drafting plans to try and reduce the amount of emissions in cities around the UK. Their ‘Clean Air Plan’ aims to tackle dirty and polluted air, reducing overall pollution. Clean air zones could be set up in dozens of cities and towns, according to the document.

Unsurprisingly, London has the highest levels of air pollution in the UK. According to a 2014 Public Health England report, poor air quality in inner London alone is responsible for 7.2 per cent of deaths in the capital, while previous studies have linked air pollution to 40,000 premature deaths a year in the UK. (Auto Express)

The plans to try and reduce emissions have become necessary as the UK has struggled to keep within EU limits on some pollutants, particularly nitrogen dioxide (NO2), which is produced by diesel engines and is linked to a range of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Some 37 of the 43 regions of the UK are in breach of NO2 limits. (BBC)

 

How would the ‘Clean Air Plan’ affect motorists?

The series of documents on a clean air strategy cover a wide variety of options, the most radical measure being considered is what’s termed a “targeted” car scrappage scheme. In its technical documents supporting the plan, modellers estimate that such a scheme could take 15,000 diesel and older petrol cars off the road.

“Under this scheme, 15,000 Euro 1-5 diesel cars/Euro 1-3 petrol cars are replaced with electric cars. The grant level that has been assumed for this option is £8,000,” the documentation states. (BBC)

The suggestion is that a scheme could be brought in within two years.

In a statement, The Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) said: “Local authorities are already responsible for improving air quality in their area, but will now be expected to develop new and creative solutions to reduce emissions as quickly as possible, while avoiding undue impact on the motorist.” (Auto Express)

diesel fuel pump

The Clean Air Plan suggests a grant of up to £8,000 for diesel scrappage

 

The UK Government previously introduced a £300million vehicle scrappage scheme in 2009 that applied to all old vehicles. In return for scrapping their old car or van, owners were given £1,000 from the Government towards a new vehicle. However, it seems the incentive to choose a more eco-friendly car will require a larger grant to get motorists to give up their long-serving diesel vehicles.

While there are benefits to embracing a diesel scrappage scheme, it has been reported that motorists could also face a ‘triple whammy’ when it comes to costs, in order to ensure the grants provided to those taking part in the scheme are cost effective. Parking charges, pollution charges, and a new tax increase are all potential dangers for a driver’s wallet.

 

Is my car eligible for the diesel scrappage scheme?

It’s expected that the scrappage scheme will target the oldest diesel vehicles on the road, which also tend to be the dirtiest. Any diesel car or van that’s more than 10 years old is likely to be eligible for the scheme, while more modern diesels will be exempt.

Initially, it’s believed that the scheme will only apply to the 10 most polluted cities in the UK, with London, Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool all on the list. However, it’s possible that if the initial trial is a success then the scheme could be rolled out nationwide. (Car Keys)

diesel fuel cap

Diesel has fallen out of favour as other, less polluting, fuels have been utilised

 

At present, the Clean Air Plan has only been through a first draft, and will likely take some time to be completed. If you’d like to read more about the plan and the results of the consultation that inspired it, you can take a look at the .Gov website here.

If you’re looking to check your car or motorcycle’s emissions, book it in for an MOT, service, or just a bit of a tune-up, you can find your nearest CTSI Consumer Code approved Trust My Garage member using our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map. Once your car is ready to hit the road you can also check out our top tips for driving in summer here, too!

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How do I ensure responsible driving on busy roads?

Latest figures from the Department for Transport has revealed that there are now more than 25.8 million cars on Britain’s roads, up from 25.2 million at the same time last year, meaning that five out of nine regions in England now have the equivalent of one car for every two people.  With car production at a high and the use of public transport declining by more than 60 percent in the last six years, the number of cars on our roads is likely to continue to grow.

With this in mind, how can you ensure you keep safe on the road? We’ve compiled the best advice to keep you and others safe when out driving.

Mind the gap

I’m sure we’re all familiar with the mantra “only fools break the two second rule”. Unfortunately, some drivers may need to repeat this a bit more often as research from the road safety charity Brake, has reported that around 14% of accidents happen as a result of tailgating and shunting. Keeping at least two seconds between you and the car in front during normal driving conditions and four seconds during bad weather, will give you sufficient time to brake if needed.

Know your limit

It may seem obvious advice to keep to the speed limit, but drivers not keeping within the limit is one of the biggest causes of accidents on the roads. Keeping to the limit is a requirement and keeping inside the target will reduce hazards and the need for heavy braking. Remember, British motorways have a maximum speed limit of 70 mph and you should only be in driving in the right lanes if you are overtaking vehicles on the left.

Timing is everything

One of the easiest things you can do to keep within the speed limit, is give yourself plenty of time for your journey. Planning ahead to make sure you have enough time, with a route plan will leave you much more relaxed, reducing your temptation to speed.

The child in a safety seat near to mother.Focus

The longer we do something the more it becomes second nature and this is just as true for driving. The benefits of being an experienced driver are obvious, however this experience has the potential to bring complacency. Before stepping into your car, make sure you are well rested, calm, alert and free from any other issues that may affect your attention.

Night driving

Driving at night is not ideal, but if you need to, there is plenty you can do to keep safe. If taking a long journey make sure you are well rested before you begin with your route planned in advance, with regular two hour breaks factored in. Don’t ignore the warning signs, if you still feel tired during your trip, find somewhere safe to stop as soon as you can. If you’re on a motorway, pull into your nearest service station – DO NOT stop on the hard shoulder and have a nap in your vehicle.

Parking

Driving responsibly doesn’t end when you stop driving, how you park can have consequences for both you and other drivers. Are you aware that UK motorists are involved in 1400 car park-prangs every day?[1] Keep your speed low when parking as this allows you greater control in a small space. Look in all directions including left, right and directly behind your vehicle as this is where a car could be backing out opposite from you and of course pedestrians could be there too!  If your car has any form of automated parking assistance – from  reversing sensors to a full blown auto parking mode remember that these are driver aids, not driver replacements!

Mirrors

Do you check your mirrors before every journey? Before setting off, make sure you check that your mirrors are in the correct position, so you can see around your vehicle. When driving you should also check them every time you change speed, or direction and before signalling

Time for a refresh

Once we’ve passed our test, unless it’s a requirement of your job, very few of us will have any additional assessments. As we become more experienced and more comfortable with driving we all have the potential to slip into bad habits. To curb this it’s a good idea to consider a refresher course every few years, ensuring you keep your knowledge and confidence up to speed.

Car maintenance

Being a responsible driver isn’t just about your behaviour and those around you. The health of your vehicle is also paramount. Beyond regular vehicle maintenance, there are various vehicle checks you can make to ensure your car is kept in good working order and reduce your risk of breakdown.  Weekly checks should become second nature, if you’re not quite sure what you should be checking, remember POWER: Petrol, Oil, Water, Electrics, Rubber.

Regular checks will help you spot any potential issues early, if you need any additional guidance, your local Trust My Garage member will be more than happy to help.

While regularly monitoring your vehicle is highly recommended it is no substitute for regular servicing from a trained professional. Trust My Garage technicians are highly skilled and will be able to spot any issues and provide you with clear advice on keeping your vehicle in top condition. To find your nearest Trust My Garage member, visit our website and simply enter your postcode into our garage finder.

You can also download the Trust My Garage app from any smartphone and it will instantly recognise your location before showing a number of trusted garages nearby. From the app, you can view garage feedback, view our educational videos and call one of our members directly to book a service, MOT, or recovery service.

[1] Accident Exchange, 2014 report

Make sure your driving isn’t costing the earth

We have already pointed out the things to look out for when driving abroad but if you are driving on holiday in the UK this year have you considered your carbon footprint? In 2008, the UK government unveiled its plan to cut the nation’s carbon emissions by 80% before 2050, and last year UK vehicle manufacturers were told by EU environmental regulations that they should cut their carbon emissions throughout the manufacturing process. So what can you do to make sure your driving not only saves money by reducing your fuel consumption, but you will also contribute to saving the planet by not releasing harmful emissions into the atmosphere?green driving

You can make a start by following our top ten tips for greener driving:

10. Change your car to one that is more fuel efficient

OK, it might seem an expensive thing to do if you have already had your car for a long time, but if you are due a change, make sure vehicle efficiency is something you consider. Typically, scaling down from a large vehicle to a smaller vehicle will result in less CO2 emissions.  Bear in mind that cars with electric engines emit no pollutants and charging stations are increasing across the UK.

9. Remove roof racks when not required

Vehicle manufacturers are always looking to make their products as aerodynamic as possible. Adding a roof box or rack on top of your vehicle compromises this. It increases the wind drag on your car, making your engine work harder and increasing fuel consumption, especially when driving at high speeds. If you don’t need to use it for your journey, remove it.

8. Check your tyre inflation

Tyres are often be overlooked by drivers, but one of the easiest ways to reduce carbon emissions is to make sure your tyres are properly inflated. Underinflated tyres make the engine work harder due to the surface drag and friction with the road surface. Properly inflated tyres have less contact with the road, encountering less friction and meaning that excess fuel is not wasted.  Driving on underinflated tyres also leads to potential damage to the tyre or the wheel rim which means you will have to change your tyres more frequently, resulting in a higher use of the earth’s resources.

7. Eliminate excess weight

We all put things in our boot and leave them in there, but this could be harming your green credentials. Remember your engine burns fuel for energy, so the more energy it needs to carry the unnecessary weight, the more C02 emissions are released into the atmosphere. Make sure you have only what is necessary in your boot and remove any items you don’t need to carry it around.

6. Drive in the correct gear for the road conditions

It is something you are taught when learning to drive, but remember to drive in the most appropriate gear for the road conditions.  Getting into fifth ( or even sixth in modern cars) gear during motorway driving, for example, whilst staying within the speed limits, will help with optimising your fuel consumption.  However, remember to stay in a lower gear when driving down steep hills.

5. Plan your route

Avoid getting lost. Not only does this add unnecessary time to your journey, it also increases fuel consumption and wear and tear on your car if it is something that happens regularly. Invest some time in planning your route before you begin a journey. This will ensure you conserve fuel as well as enjoying a stress free and pleasant journey. If you are a SatNav user remember that some devices offer a “green” option in the settings along with “quickest” and “shortest”

4. Avoid unnecessary shopping trips

For most people, shopping is a chore yet many of us make unnecessary trips to the supermarket or the local shops for items we’ve forgotten during our weekly shop.  This means increased fuel consumption, increased emissions and further wear and tear on the car. Minimise the number of journeys you make by planning ahead.

3. Drive at a steady speed

Driving within the speed limit is a legal requirement, but try to keep your vehicle at a steady speed when driving. Accelerating rapidly and braking harder than you need to all reduce efficiency and waste fuel. Drive at a steady speed and stay at that pace for as long as you can to ensure you only use the fuel you really need to use.

2. Turn off the engine when you are stationary

If you are stuck in a traffic jam or waiting to pick up a friend, turn your engine off. Many of us probably leave our engine running when we really could – and should – have turned it off. This is the easiest way to waste fuel and is more harmful to the environment.

1. Get your vehicle serviced regularly at a Trust My Garage member

Trust My Garage members have the professional expertise and vehicle know-how to keep you car a lean, green machine.  Regular services make sure things like your tyres and engine, are performing as they should and you are not unknowingly wasting any fuel or damaging the environment.

So what are you waiting for? Book in with your local Trust My Garage member today and enjoy a service backed by Trading Standards after we applied to become a government code. Enter your postcode into our website HERE and book your car in with a trusted technician today.

Help cut crime by using a Responsible Retailer Garage

So you’ve just had a set of new tyres fitted ready for the summer, or maybe you recently had one replaced due to a blow out on the motorway? Your brand new tread is the maximum depth and you hit the road a satisfied motorist. At what point did you think about what happened to the worn out, lifeless tyres that had served your motor so well over the past months?old tyres

It is actually illegal to keep waste tyres without a licence and if they are not properly reused, recycled, or disposed of correctly, they can have a detrimental effect on our communities and environment, let alone undermining legitimate businesses.

How? If illegally kept tyres catch fire, they burn toxic smoke and pollute the water which has a damaging effect on the communities in the vicinity.

Now there is an industry partnership which restores confidence in consumers about where their used tyres are going, and assures them that their tyres are being removed correctly, and reprocessed in a legal and environmentally friendly manner.

EACH YEAR THE UK GENERATES SOME 40 MILLION END-OF-LIFE CAR AND VAN TYRES OF WHICH 80% ARE COLLECTED AND REPROCESSED THROUGH THE INDUSTRY’S RESPONSIBLE RECYCLER SCHEME.

We are doing our bit today to encourage tyre retailers and garages everywhere to dispose of tyres the right way. Our Operations Manager will be presenting at the official launch of the Responsible Retailer Initiative, which recognises tyre retailers using the scheme as Responsible Retailers. We will speak on the synergies between the scheme and Trust My Garage and how we are working to communicate this message to consumers.

How can waste tyres be used?

  • They can provide fuel for cement kilns.
  • They can be transformed into various products like flooring, road surfaces, furniture, and shoes.
  • Bales of tyres can be used in the construction of modern engineered landfill sites and flood defences.

TIF Responsible Recycler Scheme members are subject to a rigorous annual audit process conducted regularly by independent environmental audit specialists. Garages that use an RRS member will be able to guarantee that tyres collected from their premises are reused, recycled or otherwise disposed of in ways which comply with UK and European statutory regulations. They will receive an annual certificate of compliance which you as a motorist can view in the workshops to be ensured that your tyres will be dealt with correctly.Responsible Retailer logo