Category Archives: facts and figures

Diesel Scrappage: What is it all about?

In recent weeks there has been much talk about diesel emissions and how they are affecting pollution levels around the globe. Diesel engine vehicles are one of the main causes of concern for pollution levels, especially on the back of the Dieselgate scandal, where Volkswagen pleaded guilty in the US to allegations they hid true vehicle emission levels during emissions testing.

Despite the new technology being used in electric and hybrid vehicles, as well as average petrol cars, hundreds of thousands of daily use vehicles are powered by diesel engines, as they are seen to be the most fuel efficient. So, in the face of a potential oncoming vendetta against diesel as a fuel, what can UK motorists do?

diesel ex

Diesel emissions are a real problem when it comes to pollution

 

Government Plans

The British government are currently drafting plans to try and reduce the amount of emissions in cities around the UK. Their ‘Clean Air Plan’ aims to tackle dirty and polluted air, reducing overall pollution. Clean air zones could be set up in dozens of cities and towns, according to the document.

Unsurprisingly, London has the highest levels of air pollution in the UK. According to a 2014 Public Health England report, poor air quality in inner London alone is responsible for 7.2 per cent of deaths in the capital, while previous studies have linked air pollution to 40,000 premature deaths a year in the UK. (Auto Express)

The plans to try and reduce emissions have become necessary as the UK has struggled to keep within EU limits on some pollutants, particularly nitrogen dioxide (NO2), which is produced by diesel engines and is linked to a range of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Some 37 of the 43 regions of the UK are in breach of NO2 limits. (BBC)

 

How would the ‘Clean Air Plan’ affect motorists?

The series of documents on a clean air strategy cover a wide variety of options, the most radical measure being considered is what’s termed a “targeted” car scrappage scheme. In its technical documents supporting the plan, modellers estimate that such a scheme could take 15,000 diesel and older petrol cars off the road.

“Under this scheme, 15,000 Euro 1-5 diesel cars/Euro 1-3 petrol cars are replaced with electric cars. The grant level that has been assumed for this option is £8,000,” the documentation states. (BBC)

The suggestion is that a scheme could be brought in within two years.

In a statement, The Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) said: “Local authorities are already responsible for improving air quality in their area, but will now be expected to develop new and creative solutions to reduce emissions as quickly as possible, while avoiding undue impact on the motorist.” (Auto Express)

diesel fuel pump

The Clean Air Plan suggests a grant of up to £8,000 for diesel scrappage

 

The UK Government previously introduced a £300million vehicle scrappage scheme in 2009 that applied to all old vehicles. In return for scrapping their old car or van, owners were given £1,000 from the Government towards a new vehicle. However, it seems the incentive to choose a more eco-friendly car will require a larger grant to get motorists to give up their long-serving diesel vehicles.

While there are benefits to embracing a diesel scrappage scheme, it has been reported that motorists could also face a ‘triple whammy’ when it comes to costs, in order to ensure the grants provided to those taking part in the scheme are cost effective. Parking charges, pollution charges, and a new tax increase are all potential dangers for a driver’s wallet.

 

Is my car eligible for the diesel scrappage scheme?

It’s expected that the scrappage scheme will target the oldest diesel vehicles on the road, which also tend to be the dirtiest. Any diesel car or van that’s more than 10 years old is likely to be eligible for the scheme, while more modern diesels will be exempt.

Initially, it’s believed that the scheme will only apply to the 10 most polluted cities in the UK, with London, Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool all on the list. However, it’s possible that if the initial trial is a success then the scheme could be rolled out nationwide. (Car Keys)

diesel fuel cap

Diesel has fallen out of favour as other, less polluting, fuels have been utilised

 

At present, the Clean Air Plan has only been through a first draft, and will likely take some time to be completed. If you’d like to read more about the plan and the results of the consultation that inspired it, you can take a look at the .Gov website here.

If you’re looking to check your car or motorcycle’s emissions, book it in for an MOT, service, or just a bit of a tune-up, you can find your nearest CTSI Consumer Code approved Trust My Garage member using our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map. Once your car is ready to hit the road you can also check out our top tips for driving in summer here, too!

Proposed MOT changes: Why the 4-1-1 system is dangerous

The Government has announced a proposal to consult on extending the time allowed before the first MOT of a vehicle’s life from three years to four – known as the 4-1-1 system (Summer Budget, 2015).

While many motorists may think this is a good idea, there is ever-growing evidence that the increase of faulty and potentially dangerous cars on UK roads would result in extra injuries and possibly even deaths. 

The Department for transport (DfT) released a report that stated that the addition of an extra year before a car’s first MOT could mean injuries rise by 2,000 a year, with an estimated 71 of those injuries being fatal.

Evidently any move to extend the time allowed before the first MOT of a car or motorcycle’s life from three years to four years would seriously endanger road safety for all road users.

Not only would the changes be dangerous, but they mean that there would also be an increase in repair costs for drivers and an inevitable increase in harmful emissions due to the additional time that vehicles had been active on the roads without the essential checks carried out during an MOT. 

 There have been previous attempts in government to introduce an extended first MOT period – in 2008 and 2011 – both of which considered the 4-1-1 as a structure for MOT frequency, and both at both of these times the government decided that no changes should take place. There have been no changes in the MOT design or car safety that would then mean that the 4-1-1 structure is now viable. 

Under the current system, 27.48 million vehicles took the MOT test in 2015 and 4 out of 10 of them were found to be unroadworthy when examined.(DVSA, 2015)  Along with this, more than 770,000 vehicles were discovered to have a dangerous defect in 2013/14, equating to nearly 2,200 every day. The problems ranged from brakes, steering, tyres, suspension, seatbelts, lights and signalling equipment.(DfT, ‘MOT Scheme Evidence base’, 2008)

 Currently many vehicles are found to be unroadworthy at three years old; therefore it stands to reason that extending the MOT to four years will mean there are even more vehicles on the roads in a potentially dangerous condition. There is a belief that because modern cars are more reliable, they do not need to be tested so strictly. In practice this is incorrect. Not only is the current MOT failure rate higher than it was in 2008 (when vehicles were less reliable), components designed to wear out – like tyres and brakes – are likely to have become dangerous by the time the vehicle is four years old.

If a vehicle has a defect by its third year of use, then extending the MOT for a further year will also have the effect of increasing the number of defects the vehicle carries, because defects associated with one component due to excessive wear could then snowball and cause defects with the related components in the vehicle. Not only is this dangerous for motorists, but it could also be costly as minor repairs that could be fixed in the third year could become major defects by the fourth. 

Not only is the proposed system dangerous to vehicle safety and public safety, it is also dangerous for the environment. Air quality and reducing emissions is a high Government priority, but extending the time allowed before a vehicle’s first MOT allows polluting vehicles (which would have been detected when they were three years old) to go undetected for a further year. This makes them far more likely to increase their polluting emissions as the engine condition further deteriorates. 

The 4-1-1 system paves the way for vehicles to be a source of danger on the roads. You can have your say about it by visiting the government consultation, designed to give people a platform for their opinions before any changes are debated by the government . It is open until Sunday 16th April, 11:45pm. To get have your say click here.

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To find out more about why the proposed changes to MOT frequency are a danger to both vehicles and road users, take a look at the ProMOTe website here.

If you think that your vehicle is due for an MOT or you feel it needs a bit of maintenance, why not visit the Trust My Garage website and find a trusted independent garage in your area? Click here to find your nearest garage

Road safety and Cyclists: How everyone can stay safe

Why are there more cyclists using the roads?

The numbers of people choosing to cycle for fun, fitness or to get to work has increased by more than a quarter in twenty years and an incredible 3.2 billion miles are cycled on our roads every year. (Think!) Add this to the ever-increasing amount of cars on UK roads and all of a sudden, there isn’t much space to share.

Although cycling-related deaths are at an all-time-low since 2010, there were still 3,337 cyclists killed on the road in 2015 (source), and figures released by the Department for Transport last year suggested cyclists are 17 times more likely to be killed on the road than those travelling in vehicles. While charities such as THINK! are helping to raise awareness and remind motorists about the safest ways to travel, there is still a lot that can be done to ensure that drivers and cyclists can use our roads in harmony.

 

THINK!’s basic tips for drivers about cyclist safety

 

We are Cycling states that cycling is essentially a safe activity, causing little risk either to cyclists themselves or to other road users. Moreover, there is good evidence that cyclists gain from ‘safety in numbers’, with cycling becoming safer as cycle use increases. However, fear of road traffic is a major deterrent, despite the health, environmental and other benefits of cycling.

They also say that cycle safety in the UK lags behind many of our continental neighbours, because of poorly designed roads and junctions, traffic volumes and speeds, irresponsible driving, and a legal system that fails to respond adequately to road danger. National and local government should therefore aim for more as well as safer cycling. These two aims can and should go hand-in-hand.

What can I do to stay safe as a driver?

Sustrans are a charity that is trying to encourage the UK to use more sustainable methods of transport, in order to help ease congestion and other problems on the roads. Their top tips for drivers are:

To make roads as safe as they can be, motorists need to be aware of cyclists too.

  • When turning left watch for cyclists coming up on your near side and don’t cut them up;
  • Give cyclists a wide berth when overtaking;
  • At night, dip your headlights when approaching cyclists;
  • In wet weather, allow cyclists extra room as surfaces may be slippery.

Remember, cyclists and motorists are equally entitled to use and share the same road space. Respecting all road users helps everyone to benefit from travelling by road. (source)

The Highway Code also has specific information for both cyclists and drivers about how to safely and properly use the roads.

Rule 211: Look out for motorcyclists and cyclists at junctions

Highway Code rule 211: Look out for motorcyclists and cyclists at junctions

What can I do to stay safe as a cyclist?

When cycling, there are also rules listed in the Highway Code that road users must obey, just like motorists. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) have also created a handy PDF that outlines some of the easy things that cyclists and motorists can do in order to work better together on the roads. Some of their best tips are:

  • Sometimes motorists can find it difficult to predict what a cyclist is going to do, so try and clearly signal any movements that could be seen as unusual to a driver.
  • When driving large vehicles, motorists can find it very difficult to see cyclists on their nearside, even with all their extra mirrors, so maintain a safe distance.
  • Failing to look properly is also a common mistake made by cyclists, and contributes to 42% of cyclist collisions at junctions.
  • NEVER be tempted to ride down the inside of any vehicle (especially a bus or lorry) that is waiting at a junction. Hold back and stay behind where the driver can see you in their mirrors. Be patient and don’t squeeze down the inside by the gutter.
  • If a vehicle overtakes you close to a left turn junction, keep a safe gap behind the vehicle in case the driver cuts in front of you to turn left.
  • When overtaking a parked car, remember to leave enough room in case a door opens (‘leave a door and a bit more’) and be ready for someone to open a door as you pass.
  • In normal conditions, ride in the ‘secondary position’, approximately 1/3 into the carriageway – avoiding debris and grid covers in the gutter. If you need to improve your visibility in poor conditions you can ride in the ‘primary position’, in the middle of the road. However, try not to hold drivers up unnecessarily.
  • When riding together never ride more than two abreast, and ride in single file on narrow or busy roads and when riding round bends.
  • The Highway Code says: At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen.

Remember: BE SAFE BE SEEN.

source: RoSPA.

rospa-cycling-safety-diagram

RoSPA diagram for maintaining a safe distance from HGVs.

What’s being done to improve road safety?

It isn’t only the public that are noticing the importance of safety for both drivers and cyclists. In June 2016 the government proposed implementing a fine of £5,000 for motorists that drove carelessly or too close around cyclists.

The idea was discussed after similar rules were created in Australia and Europe to help keep cyclists safe from dangerous driving. At the time, the Transport Minister Robert Goodwill stated: “As with other changes of this type introduced overseas, we remain interested in the change and are keeping it under review.”

While it’s true that nobody wants to get into an accident, they still happen. If your car hasn’t been running as smoothly as you like why not book it into your local Trust My Garage approved independent garage and get it back to tip-top condition?

If you’d like to learn more about staying safe on the road with cyclists – whether you’re a driver or a cyclist – you can find plenty advice on websites such as Highway Code, Brake & Think!.

 

What Trust My Garage Code status means to you

It’s great news for consumers as Trust My Garage (TMG) has now been granted Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approval under the Consumer Codes Approval Scheme (CCAS). This means that when you take your car to a Trust My Garage member, you will now benefit from additional protection beyond the standard consumer rights, giving you the added assurance of a professional service, and the knowledge that your TMG member has chosen to accept the provisions of the TMG Customer Charter which forms the basis of the scheme’s compliance with the CCAS criteria .

The CTSI aims to help consumer-facing businesses, both in the UK and abroad, maintain the highest standards, giving peace of mind and added protection to customers. Businesses wishing to apply for code approval status face a rigorous process, and approval is only granted to organisations that can firmly demonstrate a commitment to the highest level of customer service and protection, and which also have a commitment to continually improving service standards within their industry.

tmgThe TMG consumer code is now the only code in the UK exclusively open to independent garage businesses, with the aim being to raise stands within the independent sector and promote peace of mind to all customers. The code means that it will ensure a strong disciplinary framework designed to ensure garages maintain the high standards that Trust My Garage stands for. It will also support garages to ensure that motorists always get the very best service at independent garages displaying the Trust My Garage shield.

But what does it mean for you when you visit your local member?

  • In addition to knowing the technicians at your local Trust My Garage member will be regularly assessed for quality and professionalism, you now have the assurance that they will always have access to up-to-date technical information, facilities and equipment, meaning that you are guaranteed a professional, quality service every time you visit a garage displaying the Trust My Garage shield. TMG businesses comply with the highest standards set by the CTSI, the national body for trading standards professionals.
  • In the rare event that you might have a complaint regarding a Trust My Garage member, you now have additional protection beyond standard consumer rights, including a clear complaints procedure and access to the National Conciliation Service, TMG’s alternative dispute resolution provider.
  • When you take you vehicle to one of our members for a service or MOT, you can rest assured that you are dealing with a firm that is determined to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction.
  • Trust My Garage truly is the independent scheme for independent garages in the UK. We have no hidden agenda or commercial affiliation, which means we really do exist to ensure that independent garage standards are continuing to improve; we have no commercial influence.
  • There are now more TMG members than ever before. Since we became the only CTSI backed code exclusively for independent garages, we have experienced a significant increase in enquiries from garages wanting to join the scheme, but only those that meet our standards and conditions are becoming members., We now have over 2,800 members and this number is growing all the time, meaning that there really is a TMG member near you, wherever you are in the UK.

Sounds good doesn’t it? But how do you find your nearest Trust My Garage member and join thousands of motorists enjoying independent quality every day? Simply visit our garage finder on our website or download the Trust My Garage app. Enter your postcode and we’ll show you where your nearest members are.

You can download the Trust My Garage app from any smartphone and it will instantly recognise your location before showing a number of trusted garages nearby. From the app, you can view garage feedback, view our educational videos and call one of our members directly to book a service, MOT, or recovery service.

Our brand new video explains more about Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approval and what it means for you:

 

Winter Driving: 5 Key Checks

Wintereinbruch

Winter is upon us once again. And while we may not be certain of a flurry of snow every year, you can be certain that the Great British weather will throw a combination of wintery gifts our way, bringing difficulties for all of us, especially car drivers. It’s the time of year when you don’t just need to start making changes to the way you drive, but also to the way you look after your vehicle. Breakdowns are far more likely at this time of year due to poor weather conditions. So what can you do yourself to ensure this doesn’t happen and you have a hassle free winter?

Let there be light

Now that the nights have drawn in and it’s dark from mid-afternoon, visibility is a key consideration when driving. Not only are lights essential for you to be able see when driving, but also to ensure other drivers can see you. Regularly check that all the lights on your vehicle are in working order, this includes brake and reversing lights. Ensure that they are clean, especially after wet weather when the roads are muddy, and that the lights are aimed in the right direction and if you find any bulbs that are discoloured, they should be immediately replaced.

Stop right there

Brakes are an essential part of any car and therefore should be serviced regularly. This is especially important during winter months, but how can you tell your brakes are in tip top condition?

It’s a case of making sure you check them regularly. The winter months can be very wet and sometimes puddles can be difficult to avoid. When driving through a puddle, make sure you test your brakes afterwards by driving at a slow speed and gently applying pressure.

Listen out for warning signs, brakes will let you know when there is a problem whether this is through grinding or squeaking. Sometimes your car will act like it has a mind of its own and pull you to one side while driving, which could indicate a fault with the braking system. Look out for the signs and don’t ignore them. Vibrations and temperamental pedals are also a sign you need to take give your car some attention. Remember, that you can always take your car to a Trust My Garage member to get the brakes checked. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

A well-oiled machine?

A basic consideration for any car owner when carrying out maintenance checks is to understand the importance of keeping your vehicle well lubricated to ensure it remains in optimum condition and working order. Falling temperatures mean that car fluids will thicken, making it difficult for your vehicle to get the right fluids it needs to run properly.

Make sure you regularly check your oil levels, coolant and brake fluid. If you’re not sure how, visit your local TMG member. You can find them using the search function on our website or by using the Trust My Garage app.

Tread carefully

The importance of robust car tyres cannot be understated, as they are the only part of your vehicle that grips the road; they play a vital part in keeping you and your vehicle safe. Wintery conditions and low tread depth can be a disastrous combination, reducing both your speed and grip. Without sufficient tread depth in wet conditions you may experience a particularly dangerous occurrence called aquaplaning. This is where tyres lose contact with the road surface and travel on top of the water’s surface. With no contact with the road, comes the inability to accelerate, brake or steer properly, and you are likely to lose control of your vehicle, thus significant increasing your risk of accident.

When checking tyre tread it is best to use a tread depth gauge rather than relying on intuition. With this implement to hand, measuring tread depth is not difficult and will take up only minutes of your time. For passenger cars, the European legal minimum tread depth is 1.6 mm, across 75% of the tyre, although the deeper the depth the better grip you will have – we recommend that you consider changing your tyres when the tread depth reaches 3mm. Check the depth of the main tread grooves in several places across and around the tyre, using the gauge. In addition, tyres have tread wear indicators in the base of the main grooves. When the tread surface is worn to the same level as these indicators, the tyre is at the legal limit and should be replaced. As a temporary alternative there is also a quick test with a 20p coin if you do not have a gauge to hand. Place the coin in the groove of the tyre and if you can see the inner edge of the border of the coin, it means your tread depth is less than 3mm and you should consider replacing that tyre.

Don’t let the pressure get to you

In addition to tread, checking tyre pressure regularly is vital, even more so during cold weather. Whether using your own pump, or a supermarket garage air pump, here’s how you can do it:-

Check what the tyre pressures should be before you start the pump, you will find this information in your user manual and often on a sticker on the hidden side of the driver or passenger door. Remember that your front and rear tyres may need different pressures. Go round the vehicle with the pump, checking the pressure on each wheel and inflating/deflating as required.

Regularly inspect the condition of the tyres and make sure there are no cracks or bulges, make sure there are no obvious cuts or tears which could lead to a blow-out or puncture and of course don’t forget that spare!

And if you ever find yourself in the event of having to change a tyre on the road, make sure you watch our video:

If you are unsure about your tyres, a visit to your local Trust My Garage member will give you peace of mind and keep you safe on the roads.

Such checks shouldn’t replace regular visits to your local Trust My Garage member for some expert advice; but being aware and prepared for all eventualities will give you peace of mind and a stress free winter.

100 years of motoring innovation and we’re still well equipped to care for your car

When was the last time you sat in your car and took a moment to truly appreciate just how incredible the machine that you’re driving really is? Because of the frantic nature of 21st century life it’s all too easy to take your vehicle for granted, but when you consider all of the technological innovations that are in it, with each square inch containing an individual miraculous engineering breakthrough, it’s clear to see that cars are unimaginably brilliant objects.

Take your engine for example, which uses breakthroughs that hark all the way back to the late 1600s when practical French scientist Denis Papin started work on a mechanical alternative to animals pulling carriages. Seemingly impossibly invented, designed and built, the modern world simply wouldn’t revolve without engines. You might simply see your car as something that gets you from A to B, but what you’re driving around in is undeniably one of the most important inventions in the history of mankind.

The fascinating innovations that have occurred in the automotive world are truly mind blowing, and they mean our driving experiences are far safer and more enjoyable. Quite naturally, the way that we maintain, service and repair our cars has significantly changed as they have become more sophisticated and powerful. However, you can rest assured that all of our members are fully trained to stay on top of these developments, and this training is an ongoing process.

We recently successfully delivered hybrid vehicle awareness training to over 1,200 of our members. Hybrid vehicles use more than one power source, usually combining an internal combustion engine and one or more electric motors, and the first really popular one, the Toyota Prius, was introduced as long ago as 1997.  Many of the servicing tasks on a hybrid vehicle are exactly the same as on any other vehicle – but the nature of high voltage systems means that there are some important safety issues to be aware of. That’s why we delivered the training to our technicians, to ensure that our members are able to service and repair hybrids, meaning you can enjoy the numerous benefits of independent servicing, whatever make and model vehicle you drive.

The same applies to electric cars, which actually date as far back as the mid-1800s and yet again it was a Frenchman who was at the forefront of that technology! Since then they’ve come a long way and there are still continual advancements being made. That’s why we’re passionate about ensuring our members constantly undergo training so they can keep ahead of these innovations. In fact, we’re so dedicated to our training programmes that our technicians are just as skilled as main dealers to service and repair your car, and often at a more affordable price too!

Take a look at our infographic below which looks at some of the most important automotive innovations of the last one hundred years that have changed the way you drive and the way we service and repair vehicles. The most important of them all? In our unbiased eyes, it happened in 2010! Comment below and tell us your favourite.

100_Years_TMG_FINAL

How to avoid getting in too deep with too low a tyre tread

service
Trust My Garage was set up to ensure that motorists always receive an honest and trustworthy service every time they visit an independent garage for a service, MOT or repair. However, we know that there are a number of rogue traders out there that do not adhere to the strict customer service regulations that our member garages comply to.

Typically men are more confident when going to a garage than women. A recent report from car insurance company Sheila’s Wheels stated that more than four million female drivers admit to putting their lives at risk by continuing to drive faulty and potentially un-roadworthy cars because they dislike the experience of visiting a garage. It’s a common feeling among women and many female drivers will likely identify with this statement.

This is an experience of a young female driver who feels she was taken advantage of by her local garage, who is not a TMG member.

Motorist, Natalie Hunt, from Nuneaton told us: “Last summer I returned from my holiday abroad to find that I had a flat tyre on my car. Much to my dismay I had just spent every last Euro in the Duty Free section of Palma airport in order to shade the blues of having to return to England. Forking out for a new tyre was the last thing I wanted to do!

“Regardless, I needed to drive to work the next day so I visited my nearest garage, which I have since found out is not a TMG member. It was already an unsettling feeling visiting such a masculine environment. Much to my expectation I was informed that I needed to replace the tyre, which I agreed to. The mechanic started looking around my car and said I also needed to replace the other three tyres as they were going bald and could be a danger to me. The cost of my repairs had just risen in excess of £300 within 30 seconds! I had my doubts to this man’s claim as I had only purchased my car two months prior to this, but I just wanted to get out of there as fast as possible, and trusted him as the expert in this matter.

“I can remember learning about tyre tread in my driving lessons, and was pretty sure that these tyres weren’t on their way out, but was worried that I could be driving around in a potential death trap. Subsequently I had to borrow some money to afford to pay for these tyre replacements.

“I can totally understand why other women would feel vulnerable when getting their cars repaired, particularly if they lack knowledge of car maintenance. Next time I need a service or repair I will definitely be looking for my local Trust My Garage member so I can feel assured that I am receiving a high quality, honest service.”

Tyre3A penny for your tyres

The legal minimum tread depth for passenger cars in most of Europe is 1.6mm across the central three quarters of the tread width and round its entire circumference. However it is generally recommended that car tyres should be changed when the tread depth reaches 3mm.

Different rules apply to different vehicle types and there is some variation in a few countries. You should also be aware that different rules apply to winter tyres. Make sure you check the rules if you are planning to travel in Europe.

Place a coin in the groove of your tyre tread which runs right round the circumference. Then roll it along the groove until it reaches a bump in the bottom. This bump is the tread wear indicator. If this bump is still within the depth of the tread then it is still legal. If it is worn down and there is no depth of groove above the indicator then it is NOT legal.
If your tread depth is not legal, you should visit your local Trust My Garage member to have your tyres replaced. You can find your local member here.

Have you answered our survey about women drivers?

Are women getting better at maintaining their cars?

The female sex has always been renowned for the upkeep of their physical appearance with hairdressers, salons, and female gyms on the corner of every street. So we want to find out if women are taking the same approach with their vehicles as recent research from the DVLA shows female ownership of cars has risen by 70% since 1994.
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Back in 2010 UK based e-commerce company carshop.com (formerly autoquake.com) found that in general women are not as good as men when it comes to performing basic car maintenance tasks.

We want to find out if these figures have changed in the past three years.

What did the 2010 survey find?

tmg12% of women never check their car’s oil level compared to under 8% of men

We say: “Failing to do this can lead to engine failure and ultimately a HUGE repair bill. If you haven’t checked your oil levels recently and think this may be causing problems to your engine, visit a TMG member in your local area. The more you frequently you check your oil, the more likely it is that you will identify a problem early.”

tmgTwice as many women (14%) as men (7%) admitted to never checking their tyre pressures

We say: “Neglecting your tyre pressures means you could be risking your own life as well as your passengers, and increasing fuel consumption. If it’s just a case of not being aware of whether the pressure is correct you can always consult a trusted professional through Trust My Garage and they will assist you in ensuring your tyres are road safe.”

tmg20% of women said they have NEVER checked the tyre tread-depth

We say: “Not doing this could mean that your car is unsafe on the road, and actually ILLEGAL. TMG members give an honest account about how safe your tyres are!”

If you agree or disagree with these figures, we are inviting you to answer our poll so that we can see whether women are becoming more pro-active with regard to the health and maintenance of their cars, as demand from the female market for car purchasing and maintenance remains firm.

ANSWER OUR SURVEY HERE