Category Archives: Motoring

Motoring forwards – Find out what drives your vehicle with Trust My Garage

There are many elements to driving a car, but one of the most important is how it’s propelled forwards! Find out all you need to know about which type of “wheel drive” could work best for you with the Trust My Garage blog – read on to discover more.

Front-Wheel Drive

Front-wheel drive is the most common layout for the engine and transmission set-up in the new car market and has been so for the last few decades. It works by the engine only sending power to the front two wheels of the vehicle (hence the name), effectively pulling the car along from the front.

Front-wheel drive is so popular in the car market because it is less complex and more affordable to engineer, compared to rear or four-wheel drive, and it also is better for fuel economy!

However, front-wheel drive does have certain limitations which make it less than ideal for high performance cars. Although many hot hatches do use it, front-wheel drive can’t offer the same kind of rapid acceleration you see from rear or four-wheel drive cars.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684337

Rear-Wheel Drive

While most front-wheel drive cars also sport their engines in the front of the vehicle, with rear-wheel drive vehicles the engine can be located in different places (such as in the middle or rear of the vehicle). Rear-wheel drive works in the opposite manner to front-wheel drive, with the engine sending power to the rear two wheels of the vehicle and using it to push the vehicle forwards from the back.

Rear-wheel drive offers better acceleration than front-wheel drive. Unlike front-wheel drive, it is possible to achieve optimal 50/50 front/rear weight distribution with a rear-wheel drive car, which offers better balance and handling in a vehicle.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684227

However, rear-wheel drive often compromises cabin practicality because the powertrain requires a driveshaft. This creates a bump in the passenger cabin, losing space for anyone sat in the vehicle. Rear-wheel drive is also less efficient than front-wheel drive and can be difficult for drivers to handle if there’s no traction control or road conditions are slippery due to the weather.

Both front- and rear-wheel drive can also be referred to as “Two-wheel drive”, as they only use two of the vehicle’s wheels to propel it forwards.

All-Wheel Drive

All-wheel drive offers a setup in which the engine’s power gets sent to a vehicle’s four wheels for maximum traction. All-wheel drive is all about varying the amount of power sent to each wheel, either mechanically or electronically.

All-wheel drive can either be offered as a part- or full-time system, depending on the model of vehicle and driver preferences. Some models now feature a system that allows the driver to disconnect the rear wheels when driving at speed, reducing drag and improving fuel economy. More expensive systems may also have a feature that engages and disengages all-wheel drive automatically based on the road conditions, detected by sensors around the vehicle and calculated by an onboard computer.

4-Wheel Drive

Sometimes referred to as 4×4, four-wheel drive powertrains are largely associated with SUV models, but can also be found on numerous family and executive cars, especially among vehicles with higher specs.

This system’s main distinction is that it’s typically used on vehicles designed and built to handle the unpaved wilderness.

Unlike all-wheel drive, it sends power to all four wheels equally and without variation, meaning each wheel will spin at the same constant rate as all the others. The equal split of power is great for manoeuvring through tough, low-traction situations, but it isn’t very friendly on the pavement.

By Moebiusuibeom-en – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9684357

Driving a four-wheel drive car on solid ground can make simple actions like turning around in a tight street very difficult, because the wheels are no longer in sync. Most modern four-wheel drive vehicles are equipped with a part-time system, meaning they operate in two-wheel drive mode in normal driving conditions. This way, the driver can engage the four-wheel drive system manually from the cabin only where necessary.

Keeping your vehicle in wheely good condition

Regardless of how your motor is propelled forwards, it’s important to keep it in a safe and legal driving condition. For a professional garage experience, you can find a local CTSI approved Trust My Garage member by visiting the Trust My Garage website’s ‘Find a Garage’ map!

Apart from finding a garage nearby, you can also read reviews from other motorists about the members in your area to help you decide which garage is right for you. Try it out here:

Every garage in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association, which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice, so they can help you motor on happily and safely.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for you and your vehicle – and you can find out more by visiting us at TrustMyGarage.co.uk or checking out our Facebook and Twitter pages!

The Highway Code – How well do you know the rules of the road?

The Highway Code – How well do you know the rules of the road?

The Highway Code is a set of information, advice, guides and mandatory rules for all road users in the United Kingdom. It operates as a tool to promote road safety – but how well do you know the rules laid out in it? Find out on the Trust My Garage blog!

We’ve put together a quiz to test your knowledge across different areas of the Code, so you can find out if you know enough to write the book – or need to read it cover to cover! Try your hand at our questions below and be sure to leave a comment if you’re pleased with your score.

If a rule in the Highway Code is a legal requirement, it is identified by the use of which phrase?

  1. ‘Do/do not’
  2. ‘Should/should not’
  3. ‘Must/must not’
  4. ‘Never/always’

When passing an animal on or near the road, you should:

  1. Sound your horn
  2. Rev your engine
  3. Accelerate rapidly
  4. Drive slowly, give them plenty of room and be ready to stop

Where lanes are restricted due to roadworks, you should:

  1. Merge in turn with other traffic
  2. Slow down to a stop and turn off your engine
  3. Accelerate rapidly to get away from traffic
  4. Allow drivers from other lanes to pass but hold up vehicles behind you

When visibility is seriously reduced due to adverse weather, you must:

  1. Switch on your fog lights immediately
  2. Use your headlights when you cannot see for more than 100 metres
  3. Keep your headlights switched off to avoid dazzling other drivers
  4. Stay inside and not drive at all

What does the below arm signal mean when used to inform other road users:

  1. I intend to move out to the right or turn right
  2. I intend to slow down or stop
  3. I intend to move in to the left or turn left
  4. I intend to reverse

What is the maximum penalty fine for speeding?

  1. £1,000 fine (£2,500 for motorway offences)/Discretionary disqualification
  2. £2,500 fine (£3,000 for motorway offences)/Discretionary disqualification
  3. £500 fine (£1,000 for motorway offences)
  4. £1,000 fine (£2,500 for motorway offences)

If you have to stop your vehicle on the roadside you must:

  1. Open the door without checking for pedestrians
  2. Park facing against the traffic flow
  3. Only apply the handbrake if you are on a hill
  4. Switch off the engine, headlights and fog lights

If your vehicle breaks down, think first of all other road users and:

  1. Wear dark clothing and try to avoid being seen by other drivers
  2. Warn other traffic by using your hazard warning lights if your vehicle is causing an obstruction
  3. Leave the vehicle in the road for as long as possible
  4. Do not call for help

How do you think you did? Check out the answers below to see how well you scored!

ANSWERS

1 – C, 2 – D, 3 – A, 4 – B, 5 – C, 6 – A, 7 – D, 8 – B

If you scored well, congratulations! You know your stuff when it comes to the Highway Code. If you need to brush up on the correct answers you can read the Code in full here.

Test your motor as well as your mind

Before heading out on to the road, it’s important to make sure your knowledge is up to scratch – but you should also make sure your vehicle is safe and roadworthy too! With Trust My Garage, it’s simple to find a reputable local garage to help you with your motor’s servicing, MOT and maintenance.

With over 2,900 members across the UK, you’re never far away from a TMG member. We’ve even created a handy search function so you can locate your nearest TMG-approved garage with ease!

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs. Try it out below:

Since 2016 Trust My Garage members have all operated to a strict Code of Conduct, which has been approved by the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) – the national body for trading standards professionals. Trust My Garage is currently the only CTSI backed code exclusively for independent garages, so you can rest assured that you are dealing with a firm that is determined to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction.

Want to know more about TMG? To get more information or to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

Using the UK’s motorway network – The Trust My Garage guide to driving safely

With approximately 2,173 miles of motorway network spanning the UK, it’s vital for motorists to understand the requirements for travelling these roads safely. If you’re looking to learn how best to utilise the system in a safe and legal manner, look no further – the Trust My Garage blog is here to help.

What are the motorway basics?

Motorways and dual carriageways allow traffic to travel faster and in greater safety than on ordinary roads, but it’s very important for motorists to know the rules that apply on them.

To enter, drivers use a slip road system, enabling them to filter into the existing flow of traffic already using the road, accelerating to match the traffic flow. You must give priority to traffic already on the carriageway, and not force your way into the traffic stream as this could cause other drivers to perform evasive manoeuvres, leading to an accident.

Slip roads also allow you to leave a motorway or dual carriageway, but you’ll need to be in the left-hand lane so that you can drive onto the slip road when you reach it. Move into the left-hand lane in good time to make sure you don’t have to cut in front of other vehicles or miss your exit. Motorway junctions typically have information signs at 1 mile prior to a junction and another at half a mile, to provide drivers travelling at high motorway speeds sufficient time to move to the left.

At no point – unless directed by the police, Highways England traffic officers or DVSA officers – should you stop on the motorway. If you have to slow right down or stop because there’s serious congestion ahead, you can use your hazard warning lights briefly to alert drivers behind you. Remember to turn them off when the driver behind you has slowed down.

The default speed limit on the UK’s motorway network is 70mph. However, some motorways operate as “smart motorways” or “managed motorways”, where variable speed limits and lane closures are displayed on signs on gantries above the road at regular intervals.

There are two kinds of motorway speed sign:

  • If the speed limit is in a red ring, that’s a mandatory speed limit.
  • If the speed limit is surrounded by flashing amber lights, it’s an advisory speed limit based on traffic and weather conditions.

To learn more about how smart motorways work, check out our blog post Driving on smart motorways – what are they and how do you use them?

What do I need to know when driving on the motorway?

Drivers should utilise the left lane wherever possible when using the motorway, and only venture to the central and right-hand lanes to overtake slower traffic before returning to the left lane after the manoeuvre is completed safely. You should never use the left-hand lane to pass a slower vehicle –known as “undertaking” – unless all lanes of traffic are moving slowly, but the left lane is moving slightly faster. Drivers should also use their indicators as normal to alert other motorists of their intention and allow them to act accordingly.

Rule 264 of the Highway Code states:

  • You should always drive in the left-hand lane when the road ahead is clear.
  • If you are overtaking a number of slower-moving vehicles, you should return to the left-hand lane as soon as you are safely past.
  • Slow-moving or speed-restricted vehicles should always remain in the left-hand lane of the carriageway unless overtaking.

If you’re driving at night or in low-light conditions, the reflective studs in the road, commonly known as “cat’s eyes”, can also help you to determine the position of your vehicle on the road. Here’s what each coloured stud means:

  • Red – Hard shoulder division
  • Amber – Central reservation division
  • White – Mid-lane division
  • Green – Slip road division

Average speed cameras – what are they?

Average speed cameras have been installed over 250 miles on British roads, in areas around the country. They work by tracking the speed of your car between two points – so slowing down to go past the camera and then speeding up afterwards will not fool it!

The cameras will record your number plate when you pass the first camera, then again at the second, and perform a quick calculation based on the current time to work out how long it took you to travel between the two points. If the time it took you to travel is quicker than could be done at the speed limit, you’ll get a fine and penalty points on your licence.

The cameras can also operate across multiple lanes of traffic, so changing lanes won’t help you – only driving at or under the posted speed limit will.

The best method to avoid a speeding ticket is, of course, not to speed.

How can I make sure my vehicle is safe and roadworthy?

Prior to setting out on any journey, particularly longer trips, you should always check your vehicle for any visible issues or potential problems. Drivers should check:

  • Engine oil, coolant and screen wash are within their respective required levels
  • Tyre pressures and treads – Tyres should meet the legal minimum requirement of 1.6mm across the central three-quarters of the tyre in a continuous band around the whole of the tyre with no bulges, bubbles, cuts or tears, or you risk a £2500 fine and three penalty points per tyre – or worse! Tyre pressures should match the BAR/PSI indicated in your vehicle’s Owners’ Manual.
  • Fuel level – Running out of fuel is one of the most common causes of breakdown on the UK’s motorway network, so check you’ve got enough fuel for your trip and take note of any available fuel stations en-route to fill up as necessary.

It’s also recommended that you check your lights and wipers to make sure they too are in working order and good condition.

If your car is due its MOT or a service, make sure to take it in to a garage to get it ready for the road. If you’re looking for a reputable, local, independent garage you can head to the Trust My Garage website and use our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map to locate your nearest TMG member, operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved code of conduct.

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs.

What happens if I break down on the motorway?

In the event of your vehicle developing a problem the Highway Code says to leave the motorway at the next exit or pull into a service area. If you can’t do so, you should pull onto the hard shoulder and stop as far to the left as possible, with your vehicle’s wheels turned to the left.

If possible, try to stop near an emergency telephone (situated at approximately one-mile intervals along the hard shoulder).

Once you have safely pulled over, switched off the engine and removed the key from the vehicle, exit it as soon as possible. You should leave the vehicle by the passenger side door so that you’re not at risk of oncoming traffic. Make sure all passengers do the same, and that they keep well away from the carriageway.

Put the hazard lights on, and, if it’s dark, put your side lights on too. If it’s foggy, put the fog lights on if you can do so with the vehicle switched off. Generally, if you can’t see for more than 100 metres, the visibility is poor and that’s when your fog lights should be used.

The Highway Code advises that any pets travelling with you be left in the vehicle – unless you consider it to be an emergency situation. If that’s the case, take them out of the vehicle but make sure they are kept under control at all times.

You should then call for breakdown help. If you have breakdown cover and an available mobile phone, contact your provider, then try to stay calm and wait for help and support to arrive.

If you don’t have access to a mobile phone – or the battery has drained – then you need to use an emergency telephone. These are located at one-mile intervals along the hard shoulder and are easy to identify because they’re in bright orange boxes.

If you’ve broken down, you’ll need to walk to an emergency phone. Face the oncoming traffic and follow the arrows on the posts at the back of the hard shoulder. The emergency telephone is free of charge and connects directly to the Highways Agency or the police.

While on the phone, give as many details as you can – including your location – and inform the Highways Agency or police if you are a vulnerable motorist such as disabled, travelling alone, older, or with small children.

Your breakdown support will be able to assess if the vehicle requires towing away or if it can be repaired and can re-join the flow of traffic. If you can once again enter the road, be patient and wait for a safe gap in the traffic. If possible, use the hard shoulder to build up speed so you’re entering the carriageway with some momentum rather than slowly, with as little traffic as possible.

Don’t forget, weather in the UK can be unpredictable. If you’re planning a long journey, it is always a good idea to keep warm, weatherproof clothing in your vehicle as motorways offer little shelter from the elements. For an additional safety measure, you may also want to keep high-visibility clothing in your vehicle – wearing a hi-vis vest helps alert other drivers to your presence and could help prevent a potentially fatal accident.

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

Summer motoring – How you can stay safe on the roads with Trust My Garage

With Highways England predicting an additional 700 breakdowns on the UK’s roads in July and August, it’s more important than ever for motorists to be prepared for the Summer! Read on for our top tips on how you can stay safe this season with Trust My Garage.

Keep it cool

With a little bit of luck, in the summer temperatures heat up, giving you plenty of chance to get out and about in your car! On hot days motorists should keep a cool, circulating air current in their vehicles, as this helps keep you comfortable from the heat and alert while driving.

You should also pack bottles of water for any longer trips or days out to help keep heatstroke and dehydration issues at bay, as these can impair your driving abilities.

Many modern cars now have air conditioning, and this will help keep you cool whilst driving, but it’s wise to makes sure your air conditioning is working efficiently. To help with this, many garages offer air con “re-gas” services, where your motor’s refrigerant gas levels can be checked and topped up to ensure it works at its best.

Take a walk around your vehicle

Before setting out on any trip some basic vehicle checks could save you trouble once your journey has started. Particularly for longer travels you should, as a minimum, check:

  • Engine oil – Long travel times can cause friction and damage to your engine, so be sure to keep it properly lubricated.
  • Coolant – Traffic jams can cause your engine to overheat if your coolant levels are low, so keep it topped up to keep on moving!
  • Screen wash – Dirty windscreens can be amplified by bright sunlight, so make sure yours can be clean both inside and out
  • Tyre pressures and treads – Tyres should meet the legal minimum requirement of 1.6mm across the central three-quarters of the tyre in a continuous band around the whole of the tyre with no bulges, bubbles, cuts or tears, or you risk a £2500 fine and three penalty points per tyre – or worse! Tyre pressures should match the BAR/PSI indicated in your vehicle’s Owners’ Manual.
  • Fuel level – Running out of fuel is one of the most common causes of breakdown on the UK’s motorway network, so check you’ve got enough fuel for your trip and take note on any available fuel stations en-route to fill up as necessary.
  • It’s also recommended that you check your lights and wipers just to makes sure they too are in working order and good condition.
  • Don’t forget, this is the UK and we can have a down pour at any time and after a dry spell – the first rainfall can result in a slippery road surface, so be prepared to adjust your speed and driving style to match any changes in driving conditions.

Consider your allergies and medication

The NHS estimates that there are 10 million people with hay fever in England alone, and in summer symptoms can be severe. While driving with your windows open is a nice way to enjoy a summer breeze, it can also lead to streaming eyes and sneezing fits for hay fever sufferers!

Medication is available to combat these symptoms, but you should always check labels prior to driving to make sure any side-effects, such as blurred vision and drowsiness, won’t affect your driving ability. If you are ever unsure of any medication’s side effects, you should always check with your doctor.

Check your routes (and alternatives!)

Heavy traffic can ruin a summer trip, so research your route before you set off! By checking routes before you leave you can help alleviate the stress of being stuck in a traffic jam. If you do get caught out on the road look for diversion signs, or ask a passenger to try a find a suitable alternative route. If you want to avoid peak traffic, avoid travelling on Sunday evening before school terms start and steer clear of rush hour motoring.

Most of us use satnavs to find our way around these days but it’s always a good idea to have a map book in your car too, just in case. You never know, switching off the sat nav and finding a interesting place to take a break from driving might just help you relax a little and enhance your trip.

Remember: rule 149 of the Highway Code states that you MUST NOT use a hand-held mobile phone or similar device when you’re driving. Make sure that you check the travel news before you leave, or use the live traffic function if you own a sat-nav with traffic update features.

Take the time to Trust My Garage

If your car is due its MOT or a service, make sure to take it in to a garage to get it ready for the road. If you’re looking for a reputable, local, independent garage you can head to the Trust My Garage website and use our handy ‘Find a Garage’ map to locate your nearest TMG member, operating to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI)-approved code of conduct.

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs.

You can also check out our latest TV advert below:

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

What to do when… your car needs parts for repairs

We’ve all been there – you’re out on the road and you hear a suspicious noise, or you’ve tried to start your car in the morning and it just won’t start. It’s one of the unpredictable parts of motoring, but what should you do when your vehicle needs parts for a repair? Trust My Garage has the answers!

Have a professional diagnose the problem

First things first, it’s important to know exactly what the problem is. The average UK motorist usually does not have an in-depth knowledge of exactly how their vehicle functions, but sometimes providing the smallest piece of information can help your local Trust My Garage Member find the cause of your problem.

Modern vehicles are complex machines and accurate diagnosis by an experienced professional can save you time and money. Research has shown that, on average, motorists spend over £170 having their own attempts at vehicle repair fixed by a professional. If you need to find a local, reputable garage you can rely on Trust My Garage’s “Find a Garage map” to see which businesses in your area subscribe to our CTSI-approved code of Conduct. Try it out below:

See what parts are needed

Should your vehicle need parts to complete the repair, these will be quoted for, along with the labour cost to fit them. If you’re looking to compare more than one garage’s prices you can ask for this information upfront before going ahead with any work to be completed.

All Trust My Garage members operate under a “Customer Charter”, where they promise to treat the customer and their vehicle with respect. As part of this Charter, you can ask for a fixed quote or estimate, inclusive of parts, labour and VAT prior to approving any work on your vehicle.

Utilise garage for professional repair and warranty

If your vehicle does need new parts to get it back into a safe and roadworthy condition, it could be tempting to cut costs by purchasing your own parts from a supplier and asking a garage to fit them – but this is where some serious issues could develop.

As a customer, it may be possible to purchase parts that appear cheaper than the initial quote provided by a garage and then ask them for a cost to fit those parts – however, doing so could cost you much more, further down the line. If the parts are not correct for any reason, or are counterfeit, it could cause serious damage to your vehicle or even cause an accident, putting you, your family and other road users at risk. You may even have to pay a for the job to be done again with the correct parts!

Many garages now refuse to fit parts supplied by a customer as they cannot guarantee the integrity of the part itself, and therefore the repair – and you can read more about why here.

Essentially, if the garage has sourced the part, it is responsible for the job from start to finish, and will deal with any warranty issues in line with parts manufacturers terms and conditions should there be an issue. If a consumer supplies a part that is incorrect or malfunctions down the line, it can be difficult to establish whether the problem was caused by the garage’s fitting of the part, or part itself.

Although there is some room for interpretation under the law, it is a garage’s obligation as the expert, to not proceed with the fitment if they believe the parts supplied to be unfit for purpose or of unknown quality. Even if a customer signed a declaration relinquishing any warranty claims between themselves and the garage.

Protect yourself and your vehicle

Although wanting to save money is understandable, vehicles are complicated pieces of machinery and it’s always best to let a trained technician do their job – after all, they understand the ins and out of vehicles that drive on to their premises.

As well as this, using the wrong part could damage your vehicle, so you could be out of pocket and still be left with a problem that needs solving. It’s much safer and better value in the long run to use the skills of a trained technician, such as one of our TMG members.

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who agree to comply with a strict code of practice, so every customer using Trust My Garage members can rely on a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value for your money.

Visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk for more information – and be sure to check out our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages too!

What is ADAS and how does it affect motorists?

Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS) have been the talk of the motor industry of late – but what does ADAS actually do and how does it affect motorists? Trust My Garage has the answers!

What is ADAS?

Advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), are electronic systems that aid a vehicle driver while driving – so they’re designed to help minimize human error, often the cause of road accidents, and therefore increase safety on the roads.

They’re one of the fastest-growing areas in automotive electronics – and future iterations are likely to include wireless vehicle-to-vehicle connectivity to help further increase safety measures. However, at the moment this is still far off in the future.

What does it do?

ADAS safety features are designed to mitigate the likelihood of a collision and reduce the effects in the event of an unavoidable collision by offering technologies that alert drivers to potential problems, or to avoid collisions by implementing safety measures and taking over control of the vehicle.

Features of ADAS vary from vehicle to vehicle, but can include:

  • Automated lighting & wipers
  • Adaptive cruise control and collision avoidance
  • Pedestrian Crash Avoidance Mitigation (PCAM)
  • Incorporated sat nav/traffic warnings
  • Alerting of a driver to other cars or dangers
  • Lane departure warning system
  • Automatic lane centring
  • Blind spot display
  • Smartphone connection for navigation
  • Road sign recognition
  • Stability control systems
  • Park distance control
  • High beam assist

Why do motorists want ADAS?

In short, ADAS is beneficial because it helps improve road safety. As previously mentioned, they’re designed to aid drivers and implement safeguarding procedures as errors happen – helping to keep road users safe.

The evidence of ADAS’s effectiveness is clear enough that many functions have become mandatory on new cars sold in various regions around the world. Currently, the EU has announced 19 vehicle safety measures that it would like to see on all new cars.

Euro NCAP (The European New Car Assessment Programme) is the UK and Europe’s car safety assessment program – establishing a 5-star rating system occupant safety in the case of a vehicle collision. Euro NCAP has embraced ADAS, and it continues to adapt its assessment procedures to address the growing number of systems and technologies.

This support of road user protection over the past few years has led to widespread consumer awareness of the benefits of safer cars. It’s also expected that Euro NCAP and its testing and rating system will play a similar role in encouraging ADAS to be adopted across the motor industry.

How could ADAS affect day-to-day driving?

ADAS technology has already begun to enhance driving for many motorists as manufacturers have begun to create and adapt their own systems. There are a number of ways in which it could affect motorists day-today, such as:

  • Reduced the amount of damage to vehicles due to anti-collision features
  • Lower repair costs due to less damage
  • Less severe accidents, reducing the amount of time a vehicle spends off the road
  • Improved road safety
  • Potential insurance discounts for vehicles fitted with ADAS
  • Fewer claims, helping to improve insurance premiums

Do motorists need to take additional care of ADAS-equipped vehicles?

In the future, ADAS checks may be incorporated into a ‘Periodical Technical Inspection’, proposed in the EU as a replacement for the MOT – however, this would still be far in the future, or possibly not happen at all.

The current iteration of ADAS can be maintained with calibration; a service that ensures the sensors and other equipment on a vehicle are working correctly individually and in co-ordination with one another. A typical ADAS calibration processes and thus the time required to undertake will vary from vehicle to vehicle. Calibration is required when the following occurs:

  • Front windscreen is replaced
  • A bumper is repaired or replaced
  • A front-end collision occurs
  • Steering geometry is adjusted
  • Suspension components replaced

A calibration is preformed to correct misalignment, so that your vehicle’s ADAS system is working as intended. If a calibration is missed, an ADAS component may not function as it should and could cause a potential risk to you and others on the road.

How can I see if a garage provides ADAS services?

Garages across the UK now offer ADAS calibration services as part of their menu – but if you’re looking for a garage that goes the extra mile, you can use Trust My Garage’s “Find a Garage” map to locate you’re nearest Trust My Garage-approved member, so why not try it out below?

If you’re unsure whether a garage offers ADAS calibration, each TMG member has their own profile page where you can read about their services on offer – and easily find contact information if you’d rather call or visit the garage yourself! You can even request a price estimate if you know what work you need.

As well as being part of the IGA, the largest and most prominent representative body in the Independent garage sector, every Trust My Garage member operates to a Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved Code of Conduct – meaning you and your motor get the quality service you deserve every time you visit a TMG-approved garage.

For more information about how TMG can help you – no matter what services you need – you can visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk, or check out our Facebook and Twitter pages here!

Trust My Garage – the network of quality independent garages you can trust

What is Trust My Garage?

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service. All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations.

If you take your vehicle for an MOT, service or repair at your local garage, how can you be sure of the quality of its work? At Trust My Garage, we truly believe that our members are the best independent garages in the UK, each one unique but all skilled professionals who are dedicated to providing top quality work.

 

Why should I choose a Trust My Garage member?

Since 2016 Trust My Garage members have all operated to a strict Code of Conduct, which has been approved by the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) – the national body for trading standards professionals. Trust My Garage is currently the only CTSI backed code exclusively for independent garages, so you can rest assured that you are dealing with a firm that is determined to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction.

 

Why can I Trust My Garage?

All Trust My Garage members operate to the TMG ‘Code of Practice for Service and Repair’, as well as utilising our Customer Charter:

As every TMG member adheres to our strict criteria, you can rest assured that you can Trust My Garage for great service, every time.

 

Where can I find my nearest Trust My Garage member?

With over 2,900 members across the UK, you’re never far away from a TMG member. We’ve even created a handy search function so you can locate your nearest TMG-approved garage with ease!

Simply pop in your postcode and our ‘Find a Garage’ map will show you all the TMG members in your area – and you can even read reviews from other customers if you’re unsure which garage is right for your needs.

Try it out here:

 

What happens if there is an issue with a garage?

If a customer does enter a dispute with a Trust My Garage member, our CTSI Code of Conduct offers a robust complaints procedure. We use an impartial Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR) provider to ensure a fair outcome in every case.

How can I find out more about Trust My Garage?

If you’re looking for more information about Trust My Garage, you can head over to our website, TrustMyGarage.co.uk. We’re also on social media, so you can get the latest motoring news and updates straight into your social feeds! Check out our profiles:

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As of this week, you’ll also be seeing more of Trust My Garage with the launch of our debut TV advert! We want motorists in the UK to Trust My Garage – so be sure to keep an eye out for the Trust My Garage shield on your screens. You can also view our advert right here, so watch the video below and see why you can Trust My Garage:

If you’re looking for more information or would like to contact Trust My Garage, please visit TrustMyGarage.co.uk or Contact Us here.

Like our new advert? Make sure to leave us a comment in the section below!

Fuel-efficient driving – How can you make your motor’s MPG go the extra mile?

As of December 2018, BBC News’ Fuel Price Calculator revealed the price of fuel per litre across the UK stood at £1.24 and £1.34 for petrol and diesel vehicles respectively (source). With the cost of filling up the tank on the rise, Trust My Garage has some top tips on how to drive economically and make your MPG go further – check them out below!

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Condense your time on the road

Did you know that when you drive a car that has been parked for a few hours the engine is cold and it uses more fuel to power the engine for the first five miles or so? By combining your errands into one daily trip you can save your pennies and your mileage – meaning your miles will last longer between trips to the pump.

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Stick to the speed limit

This one should be a given for responsible driving, but stick to the speed limits! What Car? research shows that a vehicle going at 80mph uses up to 25% more fuel than one going at 70mph.

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Spend a minute on maintenance

One of the best ways to improve your fuel efficiency is to keep your car well maintained and serviced regularly. By ensuring your car is running optimally you can utilise your fuel and go further for your pounds, even if it’s just pumping up your tyres to the correct pressure! If you’re not sure on how best to go about maintaining your car, check out our latest maintenance blog post: “Winter driving – how to stay safe when the cold hits”.

If you think your car could be in need of a service, you need a helping hand when it comes to good maintenance practice, or you think your motor could be in need of a repair, your local Trust My Garage member can help. Not sure if there’s a member near you? Pop your post code into TMG’s ‘Find a Garage’ map and we can tell you who’s nearby!

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Air-con? Air-gone!

Car heaters don’t, in general, use up much fuel as they recycle the heat from the engine. Air conditioning, however, does. It’s definitely the case if you have an older vehicle but it’s much less noticeable with modern cars. Remember that using your air-con regularly is a good thing, as it keeps the seals in good condition. It also dries the air so that it’s as useful to you in winter as it is in summer for keeping your windscreen de-misted. But what about opening windows instead? When it comes to keeping them down it may affect fuel consumption at more than 40mph, but air conditioning marginally increases fuel use at all speeds.

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Keep F1 on the track

“Slip-streaming” behind other vehicles to help save fuel is a technique Formula 1 drivers adopt, but it is highly dangerous and frowned upon by road safety experts. Similarly, switching off the engine whilst moving and coasting to a stop is also deemed to be extremely reckless – so don’t bring racetrack habits to the road.

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Take a weight off

Just like your body, your car needs more fuel to move around more weight, which means you shouldn’t cart items around in your boot unless you absolutely need to. You can also reduce weight by filling up with less fuel, more often. You’d be surprised how much more a full tank of fuel weighs than half a tank!

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Read the road and use gravity

Use gravity to your advantage and build up momentum by pushing on downhill to power through inclines. This may sound confusing, but a good way to do this is to read the road as if you were on a pushbike and accelerate accordingly. While doing this, be sure to look far ahead while driving and keep moving where possible by anticipating obstacles. Easing off the throttle and keeping momentum is better than speeding up, braking and then starting all over again.

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What is Trust My Garage?

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – every one different and every one dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service. All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association – which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand. If there’s a problem that can’t be sorted out between you and your garage, the IGA takes over and helps to achieve a happy outcome.

For more information about Trust My Garage or to locate your nearest TMG member visit www.trustmygarage.co.uk.

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Winter driving – how to stay safe when the cold hits

The UK is well into winter, so motorists should be keeping safe on our roads – but new research has shown drivers are unprepared for motoring in the chilly season!

 

Halfords, which commissioned a survey of 2,000 motorists, has found nearly half of all drivers surveyed admitted they have not conducted any maintenance checks on their vehicle – so how can you make sure you’re ready to face the cold? The Trust My Garage blog is here to help! Check out our top tips below.

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Antifreeze – keeping the chill at bay

Antifreeze is clever stuff that stops the water in your engine’s cooling system from freezing! It also does several other important jobs, making it a vital car fluid to keep your engine running smoothly.

 

As well as preventing water from freezing up, antifreeze raises the boiling point of engine coolant to prevent overheating. The stuff also protects your engine from corrosion, aids heat transfer, and prevents scale from building up internally.

 

How do you use it? There’s the concentrated form, or the ready mixed with water kind. The latter version is commonly referred to as engine coolant and can normally be used straightaway for top-ups and replacements. The concentrated form needs to be diluted with water, usually at a level of around 50% antifreeze and 50% water. Always check the pack’s instructions for the right ratio to use.

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Tyres – putting rubber to the roads

Tyre pressure and tread can be crucially important during winter, as poor tyres can cause your vehicle to slip across wet and icy roads.

 

To keep your tyres at optimum performance you’ll need to make sure your tyres are correctly inflated and have adequate tread across the circumference of the tyre – you’ll find the BAR/PSI you need in your vehicle’s Owners Manual or inside front door frame, and it’s recommended to keep your tyres at 3mm or above for optimum grip.

 

If you aren’t sure how to check your tread depth, you can employ ‘the 20p test’, which you can find out more about here. If your tyres fall under the 1.6mm legal limit you could face a fine of up to £2,500 and three penalty points for each illegal tyre!

 

If you’re looking for more information about checking your tyres you call also check out our “What to do when… you need to check your vehicle’s tyres” post for all your tyre-based needs.

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Brakes – stop the ride!

Brakes are an essential part of any car and therefore should be serviced regularly. This is especially important during winter months, but how can you tell your brakes are in tip top condition?

 

It’s a case of making sure you check them regularly, as the winter months can be very wet and sometimes puddles can be difficult to avoid. When driving through a puddle, make sure you test your brakes afterwards by driving at a slow speed and gently applying pressure.

 

Listen out for warning signs, as brakes will let you know when there is a problem – whether this is through grinding or squeaking. Sometimes your car will act like it has a mind of its own and pull you to one side while driving, which could indicate a fault with the braking system. Vibrations and temperamental pedals are also a sign you need to take give your car some attention -so look out for the signs and don’t ignore them.

 

Remember, that you can always take your car to your nearest Trust My Garage member to get the brakes checked – it’s better to be safe than sorry!

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Faults – how can you steer clear?

If you notice a fault with your vehicle, such as a cracked windscreen, dim headlight, or poorly charged battery, it’s important to get it sorted before undertaking any winter driving. If you feel there is a fault but aren’t sure how to proceed, you can always take your vehicle to a local garage to have it looked at by a professional – you can even use the TMG Find a Garage map to locate your nearest Trust My Garage member.

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If you’re looking to hit the road this winter, you can take your vehicle to your local Trust My Garage member. Whether it’s for a check-up, service or repair, the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) approved code of conduct that our members use mean that you and you motor both get the best possible service – no matter the weather!

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What to do when… you need to check your vehicle’s tyres

With nights drawing in for Winter, drivers can often overlook small but important details on their vehicles – but Trust My Garage is here to help! These top tips can help motorists when it comes to the ever-important tyre maintenance; check them out below.

 

Tyre Pressures

Checking your vehicle’s tyre pressure is easier than you might think! You can check and correct your tyre pressure at most UK petrol stations using a pay-per-use air and water station, or you can purchase your own tyre pressure gauge – the choice is yours.

If you aren’t sure what pressure is correct for your vehicle’s tyres you can refer to your Owner’s Manual. Details should be provided in either/both BAR and PSI, and you can adjust your pressures to the recommended figure. Often a vehicle’s tyre pressure information is also provided on the interior frame of the front passenger door, so be sure to check there if you need a quick reference point as well.

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The required tyre pressure for your vehicle can also depend on the load weight when travelling, so if your vehicle is needed for some heavy lifting it’s best to check your tyre pressures beforehand – as the incorrect pressure could cause a blowout or additional tyre wear. It’s also best to check your tyres when ‘cold’ – preferably when you haven’t driven at all, or have driven under 2 miles’ distance.

 

Tyre Tread

The tread of a tyre refers to the rubber on its circumference that makes contact with the road or ground. The legal limit for minimum tread depth in the UK is 1.6mm across the central three-quarters, however it is recommended to keep your tyres at 3mm or above for optimum grip. Drivers who fail to comply with the regulations face a fine of up to £2,500 and three penalty points for each illegal tyre.

Tread depth is important to maintain good grip on wet roads but, as the tread wears down, the tyres will lose the ability to grip well. The ‘20p test’ is a quick way to check the tread depth. Place a 20p coin into the main tread grooves at three points across the tyre and then repeat around its circumference. If the outer band is visible, the tyres may be unsafe or illegal and need to be checked by a professional garage or tyre specialist.

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Tyre damage such as cuts, lumps and bumps are often caused by an impact between the tyre and a kerb, pothole or object in the road. If your tyre has any of these symptoms then you must have the tyre checked as quickly as possible by a tyre specialist, as this sort of damage can result in sudden tyre failure.

 

Why is tyre maintenance so important?

Correct tyre pressure is important in order to stay safe on the road. If tyres are under/over inflated then handling and grip will worsen, potentially causing irregular or unpredictable car behaviour. Tyres that aren’t fully inflated are also more likely to suffer from a sudden rapid deflation and will suffer premature wear on the outside edges of the tyre, meaning the wheel rim and tyre will be more susceptible to impact damage. It can also impact the environment, as your car will create more emissions by working harder against the impact of improperly inflated tyres.

Ensuring your tyres have tread above the legal limit can help you remain safe on the roads by maintaining adequate grip on the surface of the road. This can help you when travelling at speed, or during sharp turns and emergency braking manoeuvres by helping the car keep a level grip across the road surface.

So to benefit from lower fuel bills, longer tyre life, increased safety and reduced CO2 emissions, make sure you check your tyre pressures and tread depth across all wheels at least once a month and before a long journey.

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Our ‘What to do when…’ series can provide some further tips and insight across other areas of motoring and vehicle maintenance to help you ensure your motor is running at its best! You can check out our other posts in the series here.

More about Trust My Garage

Trust My Garage is a collection of Britain’s best local garages – each one different and all dedicated to the highest standards of skill and personal service.

All the garages in Trust My Garage are members of the Independent Garage Association which is part of the RMI, one of Britain’s oldest motor trade organisations. IGA members are true professionals who have to comply with a strict code of practice.

Each and every customer of all Trust My Garage members can rely on using a nationally recognised brand to help you and your vehicle get the best value service for your money.

Visit www.TRUSTMYGARAGE.co.uk and type in your postcode to find your nearest trusted independent garage.

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